DiClemente, R.J., Wingood, G.M., Harrington, K.F., et Al. (2004). Efficacy of an HIV Prevention Intervention for African American Adolescent Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial

By McKay, Alexander | The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

DiClemente, R.J., Wingood, G.M., Harrington, K.F., et Al. (2004). Efficacy of an HIV Prevention Intervention for African American Adolescent Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial


McKay, Alexander, The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality


DiClemente, R.J., Wingood, G.M., Harrington, K.F., et al. (2004). Efficacy of an HIV prevention intervention for African American adolescent girls: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association, 292, 171-179.

African American adolescent girls have disproportionately high rates of HIV infection compared to their White or Hispanic male and female peers. There is now a large body of evaluation research demonstrating that well developed and implemented theoretically based HIV prevention interventions can successfully promote the adoption of protective sexual behaviours among adolescents. However, to date there have been no published evaluation reports demonstrating the effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions specifically targeting African American adolescent girls. The purpose of the DiClemente et al. study was to evaluate an HIV prevention intervention tailored specifically to the gender, socio-demographic, and cultural characteristics of African American adolescent girls.

The sample for the study consisted of 522 adolescent girls ranging in age from 14 to 18 (mean = 15.9) who attended four community health agencies in Georgia, USA. All study participants were African American and reported having vaginal intercourse in the previous 6 months. The girls were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n=251) or control (n=271) group. Girls in the HIV prevention intervention group received four 4-hour group sessions delivered to groups of 10 to 12 girls on consecutive Saturdays. The intervention was guided in design and implementation by Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Gender and Power. The research team worked with a group of African American adolescents to develop the intervention and the sessions were conducted by a trained African American health educator and 2 African American female peer educators.

   Session 1 emphasized ethnic and gender pride
   by discussing the joys and challenges of being
   an African American adolescent female,
   acknowledging the accomplishments of
   African American women, reading poetry
   written by African American women, and
   framing artwork created by African
   American women artists (p. 173).

The second session raised awareness of sexual risk reduction strategies such as consistent condom use, having fewer sex partners, and abstinence and session 3 used role plays and cognitive rehearsal to increase participants confidence in initiating safer sex conversations with partners, negotiating safer sex, and refusing unsafe sexual encounters. …

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DiClemente, R.J., Wingood, G.M., Harrington, K.F., et Al. (2004). Efficacy of an HIV Prevention Intervention for African American Adolescent Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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