An Urgent Note to Our Readers

By Haber, Leo | Midstream, November-December 2004 | Go to article overview

An Urgent Note to Our Readers


Haber, Leo, Midstream


Dear Friends,

Because of monetary constraints, Midstream will become a bi-monthly journal, publishing six issues a year, as of January/February 2005. Our cover price will rise to $4 an issue, but our annual domestic subscription rate for the six issues will remain $21 per year, $35 for two years, and $50 for three. We fervently hope that these adjustments will help to keep us solvent and functioning for many years to come as one of the leading intellectual Zionist journal in America.

But we need your help in these difficult times for most magazines, especially for those centering on Jewish content. We are non-profit. We cover the full spectrum of responsible Zionist opinion on all issues affecting Israel. We explore all the varied aspects of Jewish life in America and worldwide--political, sociological, religious, and cultural. We are, perhaps, the sole remaining venue for fiction and poetry in English with Jewish content and reference.

Last August, Jossey-Bass, an imprint of John Wiley & Sons, published a book called Best Jewish Writing 2003, edited by Arthur Kurzweil. It contained dozens of independently chosen pieces on Jewish themes culled from magazines and books throughout America and even elsewhere. The second largest number of works chosen from one single source was four. The first was fifteen--all chosen from Midstream--seven articles, two short stories, and six poems. I think that this would be reason enough and validation enough to elicit your enthusiastic support.

We call upon all our readers to subscribe to Midstream, to renew subscriptions, and to urge their friends and relatives to do so too. We call upon all who submit manuscripts to Midstream, not only to hope for acceptance of their work, which is quite understandable, but also to vote with their pocketbooks for the survival of this inimitable publication that is so receptive to American/Jewish authors. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Urgent Note to Our Readers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.