Statement by Edward W. Kelley, Jr., Member, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, before the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, May 21, 1992

Federal Reserve Bulletin, July 1992 | Go to article overview

Statement by Edward W. Kelley, Jr., Member, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, before the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, May 21, 1992


Statement by Edward W. Kelley, Jr., Member, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, before the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, May 21, 1992

I am pleased to appear today to comment on the Federal Reserve's participation in the deliberations by the National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Policies (NAC) on the fiscal 1990 Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) program for Iraq.

As you know, the NAC has been assigned by the Congress the responsibility to assist in formulating U.S. positions in various international financial institutions and to evaluate the policies and practices of U.S. government agencies that make, or participate in making, foreign loans or provide various forms of credit guarantees as part of U.S. foreign lending programs. The Federal Reserve was designated a member of the NAC under the Bretton Woods Agreements Act of 1945 and has participated in its deliberations since then.

The NAC is an advisory body. The principal function of the seven members of the NAC is to review proposed transactions, programs, and policy issues related to those institutions--both national and multilateral in which the United States is a member--that are involved in making foreign loans.

The diversity of interests, perspectives, and expertise represented by the member agencies of the NAC allows a thorough airing of divergent views on issues that come before the NAC. In most cases, a unanimity of views among NAC member agencies is attained. On the occasions when no consensus is reached, it may indicate a fundamental difference on a particular aspect of the lending program under consideration that often reflects the particular vantage point and institutional focus of the member agencies of the NAC.

In evaluating lending proposals and programs presented to the NAC, the Federal Reserve draws on its financial perspective and expertise. The Federal Reserve's principal contributions to the NAC process over time have been its ability to assess objectively the financial and economic soundness of proposals brought before the NAC and to share this expertise with other member agencies.

In light of this specialized focus of the Federal Reserve in NAC deliberations, for those proposals that involve major considerations other than economic and financial issues in which the Federal Reserve has special expertise (for example, when foreign policy or human rights issues are of overriding importance), the practice of the Federal Reserve in NAC deliberations is not to take a position on these matters and to abstain in the formal NAC decision making process. …

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Statement by Edward W. Kelley, Jr., Member, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, before the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, May 21, 1992
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