Good for Going ... and Staying

USA TODAY, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Good for Going ... and Staying


Jeep Consumer Products is a registered trademark of DaimlerChrysler Corporation, So, it's a safe bet that the folks over there know a thing or two about putting out quality modes of transportation. Actually, we weren't looking for a car, mini-van, light truck, or even a Jeep. We needed a top-notch trail bike--and boy, did we go to the right place.

For starters, the Jeep Wrangler Scrambler ($270) looks s-o-o-o cool thanks to its two-tone paint job of metallic silver and pearl blue with black accents and thick, heavy-treaded tires. And while playwright Oscar Wilde's maxim proves true--only shallow people don't judge by appearances--it takes more than good looks to get you from here to there. Not to worry. The Scrambler is built with an aluminum low-profile teardrop frame and front-disc brakes, as well as shocks, 21-speed Shimano Mega-Range drive-train, and Scram Grip-Shift changers. The shock absorbers allow us to tackle the toughest terrain--hey, going up and down curbs can hurt--and this baby shifts gears like a charm (you may not think you need 21 speeds, but wait until you try them). To sum up, as far as this sleek-looking bike is concerned--as well as Jeep's full-suspension models and youth choices--it's all about performance!

Performance likewise counts when you're sitting behind a desk--and listening to the Jeep Executive Desk Stereo System. …

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