Books and Shelving Topple as Quake Hits Calif. Communities

By McCormick, Edith | American Libraries, July-August 1992 | Go to article overview

Books and Shelving Topple as Quake Hits Calif. Communities


McCormick, Edith, American Libraries


Books tumbled off shelves, ranges collapsed, and stacks were declared unsafe June 28 when earthquakes in southern California's Mojave desert communities caused impact damage at four academic libraries and one county public library system.

Hardest hit was the Armacost Library at the University of Redlands, according to Sheryl Davis, preservation officer at the University of California/Riverside and administrator of the Inland Empire Libraries Disaster Response Network (IELDRN). The network represents a loose consortium of about 90 academic and public libraries that come to each other's aid in emergencies.

The small liberal arts institution is 70 miles east of Los Angeles. "Ten ranges holding about 42,000 volumes collapsed completely," said Klaus Musmann, acting director of the Redlands library. He also reported that because of the precarious condition of the shelves, access to the 150,000 items in government documents and the bound periodical sections has been halted.

"Redlands is older than UC/Riverside and clearly was not upgraded to the California state code requirement for anchoring bookstacks in public buildings," said Cy Silver, facility planning consultant with the California State Library. He said he had not yet been able to assess damage statewide since information so far has been anecdotal.

About 20,000 volumes toppled into the aisles at the UC/Riverside Tomas Rivera Library. "A conservator will have to repair the some 350 volumes most seriously damaged in special collections, and that's going to be expensive," said Davis, who reported "covers burst off when they hit the ground and other books plowed in on top of them." She estimated 1,200 volumes suffered damage. Under self-insurance, she said, the library would only be covered if the quake had caused water pipes to burst, a furnace to explode, or wiring to catch fire, but not for impact damage. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Books and Shelving Topple as Quake Hits Calif. Communities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.