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The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

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Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

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"Adios - that means goodbye."

- President Bush, pulling away in his pickup truck from a gaggle of reporters at his Texas ranch this week.

Turn right

What's the best way for the left to right itself? By following the right, of course.

Eminent historian Alan Brinkley, writing the lead essay in the December issue of the American Prospect, argues that Democrats can't just sit around "waiting for the Republicans to fail" - they must "emulate, at least in some ways, the great success of the right in turning itself from a frail 'remnant' (as some conservatives liked to call themselves in the 1950s) into a mighty force that now dominates American politics."

Mr. Brinkley offers four prescriptions, including building an internal infrastructure and making peace with the military, that if swallowed could once again move the Democratic Party toward majority status.

European take

We've all read in the newspapers that Europeans were "aghast" that American voters could re-elect President Bush - and in record numbers, no less.

Next Tuesday at the St. Regis Hotel, Washington plays host to European leaders who will expand on those reports by providing a "European Take on the 2004 Election."

Gayle Smith, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, will moderate a panel that includes Robin Cook, a member of the British Parliament who served as British Foreign Secretary and former leader of the House of Commons; former Portuguese Prime Minister Antnio Manuel Oliveira Guterres; and former Danish Prime Minister Poul Nyrup Rasmussen.

Can't commit

How crucial was the women's vote in the 2004 presidential election?

That depends on whether they are married or not.

A Democracy Corps survey for the group Women's Voices/Women Vote finds that unmarried women increased their share of the electorate substantially from 2000 to 2004.

"Roughly 7.5 million more unmarried women voted in 2004 than in 2000 (22 to 23 percent of the electorate in 2004 versus 19 percent of the electorate in 2000)," the survey finds. …

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