Crackdown on Athlete "Journalists." (by the International Olympic Committee)

By Garneau, George | Editor & Publisher, August 8, 1992 | Go to article overview

Crackdown on Athlete "Journalists." (by the International Olympic Committee)


Garneau, George, Editor & Publisher


Hoopster and huckster Charles Barkley has put his byline on hold-- at the insistence of the International Olympic Committee.

The IOC--in a crackdown on marquee Olympic athletes who write about the games for big newspapers in violation of IOC rules--enforced the rules against B arkiey, whose commentary was running in USA Today, and track star Carl Lewis, whose byline was running in several European publications and who appeared in television commercials. Neither was being paid.

The rule prohibits Olympic contestants from acting as journalists during the games.

After an unnamed magazine complained, the IOC ordered the U.S. Olympic Committee to enforce the rule. The USOC informed Barkley and Lewis and the publications, and a settlement was worked out whereby the format of their work changed.

In the case of Barkley, instead of writing a bylined, first-person column, he was interviewed by a staffer, who wrote the story.

"It isn't like PattiSue Plumer doing a hometown diary for the San Jose Mercury News," USOC spokesman Mike Moran said.

However, the IOC continued its policy of allowing athletes to write diaries or columns for their "hometown" papers.

Moran said that Lewis was writing for three major "mass-circulation" European publications and was doing tv commercials for his daily column in El Periodico, a Spanish sports daily. Barkley's column appeared in Barcelona in the international edition of USA Today, the nationwide U.S. paper selling close to 2 million copies daily.

IOC rules say that "under no circumstances" may an Olympic athlete "act as a journalist or in any other media capacity" during the games.

The enforcement leaves superstar athletes in the position of being paid millions of dollars a year to play sports and endorse products but unable to write what they see at the Olympics if their work appears in some of the more visible publications during the games.

Moran said he personally did not understand the rule against reporting, in light of the fortunes athletes make in sports and endorsements, but the USOC was required to follow IOC rules.

"I personally don't know what the rule means, but they are telling us to enforce it," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Crackdown on Athlete "Journalists." (by the International Olympic Committee)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.