Outdated Stereotyped Roles Still Prevalentin Gender Attitudes

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

Outdated Stereotyped Roles Still Prevalentin Gender Attitudes


They may end up beating the boys in exams but girls start their school lives far less likely than their male peers to see themselves as natural leaders.

A new study has found big differences between how young boys and girls perceive themselves.

While 46% of boys believed they were leaders, only 18% of girls saw themselves taking charge.

Girls were apparently reluctant to take control for fear of being seen as bossy while boys had no such sensitivity - they didn't want to be in charge because they were worried the role would be too tough.

Typical comments made by five and six-year-olds included, 'Girls become nurses and boys become doctors' and 'Boys want to be active and play at war and girls want to talk and include everyone'.

The poll of 2,000 primary school children was carried out for the think-tank, the Institute of Leadership.

It included an assessment of older pupils where many boys said they preferred the way girls took control of groups - though not a single girl thought the same of boys taking charge.

So are we still stuck in the days when little boys wanted to grow up to be train drivers and little girls aspired to be ballet dancers?

Cardiff-based writer and performer Gwenno Dafydd Williams, an expert on equality, is depressed but not surprised by the research findings.

'I think it's to do with the way we bring children up. I have brought my 12-year-old daughter up not to accept gendered roles. If she wants to do something, she should go for it.'

Gwenno, who works as a freelance business adviser on the WDA Equality Project for Small and Medium Sized Enterprise (SMEs), reckons children's gender attitudes are more to do with nurture than nature.

When her daughter first attended primary school, she noticed that within as little as six months, negative gender attitudes were already taking a hold.

'The teachers will get girls to do different tasks to boys. Boys are 'allowed' to be more 'boisterous' and cheeky, which encourages risk taking and rule breaking, something not encouraged in girls.

'Also in primary school, boys stand in this row and girls in that row which reinforces the fact that the sexes are separate and 'different'.

'My daughter was never a Barbie girl, first and foremost because I hate them, and the plastic imagery of womanhood it promotes, and secondly she was never particularly interested in them anyway. She was more interested in being physically active. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Outdated Stereotyped Roles Still Prevalentin Gender Attitudes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.