Perceptions of Homophobia and Heterosexism in Physical Education

By Foster, Boyd | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, November-December 2004 | Go to article overview

Perceptions of Homophobia and Heterosexism in Physical Education


Foster, Boyd, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


An important task for any educator is to provide a safe, comfortable learning environment for all students. Unfortunately, areas that are often overlooked when attempting to provide this type of environment are the issues of homophobia and heterosexism, and the potential effects on lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT) students. While these issues have been addressed within school settings, Morrow and Gill (2003) reported that, at the time of publication of their article, there had been no data-based studies of incidence or effects of homophobia or heterosexism in the public school physical education setting. The authors developed a survey instrument intended to assess the perceptions of physical education teachers and college-age young adults about homophobia and heterosexism in secondary school physical education settings.

Since no tool existed that specifically measured homophobia in physical education, the authors adapted some items for surveys of adolescents from other research, including the Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network school-climate survey. The survey instrument was completed by 82 physical education teachers (phase I) and 77 college students (phase II) in North Carolina. The student sample purposefully included LGBT-identified students and attendees of a local gay pride festival, in addition to a standard sampling from three general university fitness classes.

The beginning of the survey defined heterosexism, homophobia, and inclusive behavior, and included examples of the behavior to clarify and ensure that everyone responded to the same concepts. Heterosexism referred to behavior that assumes all students are heterosexual, such as presuming that all students come from traditional families or date only the opposite sex; homophobia referred to derogatory or dangerous behavior directed at students known or presumed to be LGBT, such as name-calling, physical assault, or property destruction. Inclusive behavior was defined as purposely including diverse populations, including LGBT students. The definitions and examples were repeated throughout the survey, and openended responses were allowed and encouraged. Respondents were asked a series of questions to determine (1) the degree to which they observed or experienced heterosexism and homophobia and (2) whether inclusive behaviors existed and to what degree physical education teachers created a safe environment for LGBT students.

Results indicated that nearly all teachers witnessed heterosexist behavior between students and between students and teachers, with 82 percent witnessing "a lot." Most teachers (61%) indicated witnessing at least some homophobic behavior between students, and about one-third indicated that they had personally experienced "some" or "rare" incidences of homophobic behavior from colleagues or students. Most teachers did not use homophobic remarks or name calling, but half used sexist comments in a homophobic manner or used the term "normal" to imply heterosexual. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Perceptions of Homophobia and Heterosexism in Physical Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.