Impasse Broken on Electoral Reforms; Presidential Powers at Issue

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

Impasse Broken on Electoral Reforms; Presidential Powers at Issue


Byline: Natalia A. Feduschak, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

KIEV - Ukraine's warring political factions yesterday agreed on a package of electoral reforms to govern a rerun of last month's fraud-ridden presidential election, but remained divided over a proposal to trim the powers of the president.

Six hours of talks that ended early today failed to break the impasse between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych, the pro-Moscow favorite of outgoing President Leonid Kuchma, and West-leaning opposition candidate Viktor Yushchenko.

Mr. Kuchma said this morning he had agreed to support a number of electoral reforms and to fire the country's central election commission, widely blamed for failing to halt the irregularities and fraud in the Nov. 21 vote, in which Mr. Yanukovych appeared to narrowly win.

But Mr. Kuchma said no deal had been reached on two key issues - whether Mr. Yanukovych's government would be dismissed ahead of the vote, and the proposed constitutional changes to trim the president's powers.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, meanwhile, backed away from what had been unrelenting support for Mr. Yanukovych by declaring he would work with whoever wins the new balloting scheduled for Dec. 26.

A team of European mediators had been meeting with Mr. Kuchma and the two candidates in an effort to end Ukraine's political quagmire, which has brought tens of thousands of protesters into the streets of Kiev.

Ukraine's Supreme Court last week voided the result of last month's runoff vote, saying it did not reflect the will of the people, and ordered a new election for the day after Christmas.

The reform package, which was being debated intensely in Parliament, represents a compromise between the opposition, which had sought measures to reduce the possibility of fraud in the new round of elections, and government supporters who had insisted on shifting some presidential powers to parliament. …

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Impasse Broken on Electoral Reforms; Presidential Powers at Issue
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