Applying Humanistic Principles Requires a Goal-Oriented Mind-Set

By Scholl, Mark B. | Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, Fall 2004 | Go to article overview

Applying Humanistic Principles Requires a Goal-Oriented Mind-Set


Scholl, Mark B., Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development


I commonly hear graduate students in my classes comment that it is difficult for them to understand how humanistic principles may be used to guide their goal-oriented work with clients. I believe that my students and like-minded readers will find the articles contained in this current issue of The Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development to be particularly helpful. In addition to being united by a common humanistic philosophy of helping, these articles also share a common theme related to effectively implementing this philosophy in practice.

In many approaches to counseling associated with humanism, the primary objective is the establishment of a facilitative therapeutic relationship. In an article particularly relevant to this objective, Wheeler and D'Andrea share their recommendations for teaching students the counseling skill of immediacy. They provide sample dialogues as concrete examples of how immediacy can be used to enhance helper genuineness, and they acknowledge that immediacy requires courage on the part of the helper. Second, Norman and Ganser discuss how humanistic principles may be used effectively in teacher training programs to improve the interpersonal dynamics between mentors and mentees. In "Empathy: Implications of Three Ways of Knowing in Counseling," Clark provides a useful instructional service by expanding upon the usual conceptions of how a counselor empathizes with the subjective experiences of a client.

On a different note, Duys and Hobson's article is intended to help counselors understand how self-esteem evolves in children. In much the same way, intrapersonal dynamics are the focus of Griffith's article,

which describes the characteristics of internal working models contributing to client wellness. Both articles characterize growth as a natural internal process that can be facilitated by counselors and educators. The challenge is for practitioners to rise to the challenge of adopting these sophisticated models of healthy psychosocial development that have significant implications for counseling practice. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Applying Humanistic Principles Requires a Goal-Oriented Mind-Set
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.