After You Have Studied General Semantics

By Johnson, Wendell | ETC.: A Review of General Semantics, December 2004 | Go to article overview

After You Have Studied General Semantics


Johnson, Wendell, ETC.: A Review of General Semantics


GENERALLY SPEAKING, you will make applications to two large groups of problems or situations: those that are essentially personal, and those that you will call professional or relatively impersonal. A word about each of these should help somewhat.

With regard to personal problems, it is to be emphasized that over the years you have grown accustomed to your own behavior and to the people and the world about you. You have a strong tendency to take for granted whatever is thoroughly familiar to you. Your notion of what is 'normal' is, therefore, determined largely by the behavior, beliefs, attitudes, customs, social conditions which you have come to take more or less for granted as 'right' or 'natural' or 'customary.' This means that, even though you and your environment may be obviously below par, you may feel that you have no 'personal problems.' Many people become so thoroughly accustomed to the frictions, bad feelings, irritabilities, frustrations, blue moods, confusions and general flounderings of their day-to-day existence that nothing short of murder or stark insanity strikes them as peculiar. They are so utterly adjusted to maladjustment that it does not even occur to them that human life might be, except by sheer luck, different from what they know it to be. The fact that you were attracted to a book like this probably indicates that you yourself have not fallen to such a state, of course, but if the above statements serve to polish your semantic lenses a bit, perhaps you will take stock somewhat more in detail than you otherwise would of your own daily round and of the particular 'peep-holes' that define your outlook on the world in which you live. (1)

You do have personal problems, of course. What they are, and how important they seem to you, depends on the amount of tension, misery and confusion you have learned to tolerate. Generally speaking, if you examine carefully what you call your 'big problems' you will find that they are made up of little things, which accumulate all but unnoticed until your tense back gives way under 'the last straw. …

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