Sudan Genocide Declaration Stirs the World

Social Education, November-December 2004 | Go to article overview

Sudan Genocide Declaration Stirs the World


One week after Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that the killings, rapes and other atrocities committed in Darfur amount to "genocide," in mid-September the United Nations' World Health Organization issued new figures saying 6,000 to 10,000 people are dying per month there in one of Africa's worst humanitarian crises.

Powell had based his finding on a State Department survey of 1,136 refugees living in neighboring Chad. He determined that "the government of Sudan and the Janjaweed bear responsibility, and genocide may still be occurring."

The Sudanese government claimed that Powell's statement was "flawed, regrettable and dismaying." The government claimed the report was "based on partial observations by an American team that had never set foot in Darfur and interviewed politicized refugees in Eastern Chad."

What is Genocide and Why is it Significant?

The word genocide came out of the violence of World War II and recalls the Nazi attempt to systematically eliminate the Jewish people in the Holocaust. The official definition is the intentional destruction of a national, ethnical, religious, or racial group. In 1948, the United Nations General Assembly gave genocide a legal definition in the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.

Historically, many heads of state have been hesitant to use the label "genocide," as doing so would make them legally obliged to act to "prevent and punish" the perpetrators.

Ten years ago, the Clinton administration resisted applying the term genocide to ethnically motivated massacres in Rwanda until 800,000 people had been killed. The former president later apologized for not having acted more quickly.

However, Powell was careful to emphasize that "no new action is dictated by the determination" that genocide is occurring, a statement that has left some activist groups frustrated. "You don't declare genocide and then fail to act," Salih Booker, executive director of Africa Action told the Inter Press Service News Agency.

The Conflict in Darfur

Tension in Darfur between black Africans and Arabs dates back decades. The two groups have long competed over scarce land, water and other natural resources.

However, the situation came to a head in early 2003, when two groups of black Africans from the region openly rebelled against the Sudanese government, demanding inclusion in new power-sharing arrangements.

To suppress the rebellion, the Sudanese government trained and armed Arab militias known as the Janjaweed, according to human rights groups. The Sudanese government denies supporting the Janjaweed.

To date, the violence has claimed some 5,000 lives and has forced 1.4 million people from their homes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sudan Genocide Declaration Stirs the World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.