Angry in Bulgaria

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Angry in Bulgaria


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Angry in Bulgaria

Bulgarian prosecutors are howling over remarks by U.S. Ambassador James Pardew, who criticized authorities for failing to combat organized crime and for harassing journalists who expose official corruption.

His remarks at the National Judicial Conference in the capital, Sofia, last week were false and politically motivated, the Bulgarian prosecutors' union said without detailing their charges.

"His statements are manipulative. They are not connected to the objective truth but are aimed at serving certain political interests," the union said Tuesday.

In his speech, Mr. Pardew praised lawmakers for the progress they have made since the collapse of communism but cited "important weaknesses in Bulgaria's judicial system."

The ambassador recognized Bulgaria's progress in strengthening some aspects of the judicial system, including legislation to combat human trafficking, enforce tax collection and establish codes of ethics for magistrates.

"Regrettably," he added, "the authorities, themselves, are locked in a cycle of recrimination and finger-pointing, as police, courts, investigators and prosecutors each blame one another for the failure of the justice system to function properly. All institutions bear a share of the responsibility."

Mr. Pardew said crime bosses are protected from prosecution and even "flaunt their immunity from the law openly."

"Their armed convoys with vanity license plates can be seen throughout the country," he said. "Brazen acts of violence continue to plague Bulgaria with frightening regularity, as criminal groups battle one another, committing murder and mayhem in public."

He noted that Bulgarian authorities interdict "enormous amounts of narcotics and counterfeit currency but, strangely, there are not successful prosecutions of major drug bosses or counterfeiters."

However, prosecutors have found time to investigate the British Broadcasting Corp. for a recent broadcast exposing official corruption. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Angry in Bulgaria
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.