Mullahs vs. Rupert Murdoch; American Pop Culture Inspires Idealism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Mullahs vs. Rupert Murdoch; American Pop Culture Inspires Idealism


Byline: Suzanne Fields, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When Sarah Jessica Parker, the star of the HBO hit "Sex and the City," loomed large in a scanty sequined dress on a billboard overlooking Jerusalem on behalf of Lux soap, a lot of prospective consumers complained. This was no way for a lady to look, especially to orthodox Jews. The bare arms and back - not to speak of bare thighs - were quickly covered in a more modest couturier design.

Unilever, the giant consumer goods corporation, got the message. To save face - and money - a spokesman said that it was the climate that dictated the change of dress. Warm weather had suddenly turned cold and the leading lady had to be protected from the big chill. Of course.

Capitalism has great regard for cultural traditions when it's likely to suppress sales. Unlike Bob Dylan, a businessman needs a weatherman to know which way the wind blows. When 10 percent of your market is made up of ultra-orthodox Jews, modesty is important.

Israelis, not unlike the natives of other Middle Eastern cultures, hold divided feelings over the importation of American pop culture and its icons. Along the road to Jerusalem, for example, songs of the king of rock 'n roll spill out of the Elvis Presley Diner into a parking lot where a 13-foot statue of the king draws in customers eager to be photographed standing next to it. Occasionally a real live human "Arab Elvis" greets visitors.

Not everyone in Israel approves of Elvis or his music, but he's relatively benign compared to some other pop culture exported to the birthplace of the three great religions. Israel, after all, is an open and democratic society, accustomed to the good and the not so good that come with public exposure to a secular world. Israelis can usually take it or leave it. Muslims see things differently.

In "Jihad vs. McWorld," Benjamin Barber blames the United States for the export of low-culture packages - including pop music, videos, movies and fast food, suggesting that they contribute to the "holy struggle" of them-against-us, even abetting terrorism. The Islamists, he says, feel they're being "colonized" by the secular materialists and polluted by imported cultural trash.

Such simplistic analysis overlooks the way our popular culture can work in mysterious ways beneath the vulgar appeal to the senses. In a lecture at the American Enterprise Institute, Charles Paul Freund, senior editor of Reason magazine, describes how our popular culture in its different guises is a conduit for liberal values, driving dynamic competition in strange and unlikely places. …

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