The Theater

By Brustein, Robert; Kovach, Bill | Nieman Reports, Fall 1992 | Go to article overview

The Theater


Brustein, Robert, Kovach, Bill, Nieman Reports


Following are excerpts from the conference, Critics and Criticism, organized by Robert Brustein Artistic Director of the American Repertory Theatre, and Bill Kovach, Curator of the Nieman Foundation and supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

OPENING REMARKS

Robert Brustein

For more years than I care to count, the critic and the artist have circled each other warily, staring into each other's eyes with coldness and suspicion, in a manner usually associated with the mongoose and the snake. Drama critics tend to regard playwrights, actors, directors and designers as thin-skinned egotists who respond only to ecstatic and unqualified praise, while theater people tend to think critics lack any understanding of their process, preferring to treat them as sacrificial animals to be lacerated in public for the sake of a glib phrase or an easy witticism. Many theater artists are so alienated from the critical process that they profess not to read reviews any more. Almost all will deny that criticism ever played any part in the development of their art.

This conference, then, is an opportunity to bring these two warring factions together, to explore the ways they can inform each other without sacrifice of detachment or autonomy. Creative artists have much to learn from informed writers about the nature of plays and the nature of theatrical roles. By the same token, critics have much to learn from artists about new directions in theater and the need to loosen up preconceived ideas.

Bill Kovach

We are meeting in a time of a communications crisis. In part it is a crisis brought on by the end of the "Cold War"--that prism through which or around which we looked at the world.

Now it seems no government knows how to respond to Serbia, Bosnia or Herzegovina outside that framework. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Theater
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.