THE POST DEBATE: Fears That Living Wills Will 'Pressure' Elderly; Few Issues Have Caused as Much Soul-Searching in the House of Commons Than This Week's Discussion about Living Wills. Political Editor Jonathan Walker Reports

The Birmingham Post (England), December 17, 2004 | Go to article overview

THE POST DEBATE: Fears That Living Wills Will 'Pressure' Elderly; Few Issues Have Caused as Much Soul-Searching in the House of Commons Than This Week's Discussion about Living Wills. Political Editor Jonathan Walker Reports


Byline: Jonathan Walker

Advance directives, commonly known as living wills, are documents that spell out how an individual wants to be cared for if they become seriously ill and are no longer able to be make their own decisions.

They enable people to state in advance that they do not want to receive certain types of treatment of they are incapacitated.

This can include instructing doctors not to resuscitate them. Most controversially, it can also include refusing food or water if they are incapable of eating in the normal way and need to be fed through a tube.

Critics of living wills say this will lead to people being deliberately starved to death.

The proposals are contained in the Mental Capacity Bill, which received a very stormy ride in the Commons on Tuesday. Now it will go to the Lords, where peers are likely to reject some of the most controversial aspects.

Opposition to the proposals was led partly by Iain Duncan Smith, the former Tory leader.

On the Labour benches, the measures were opposed by backbencher Claire Curtis-Thomas.

She cited the case of her own mother, who made out a living will, but changed her mind after she suffered a second stroke.

The case in favour was made by Baroness Warnock, who spoke of elderly people 'doing the decent thing' and relieving their relatives of the burden of their care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE POST DEBATE: Fears That Living Wills Will 'Pressure' Elderly; Few Issues Have Caused as Much Soul-Searching in the House of Commons Than This Week's Discussion about Living Wills. Political Editor Jonathan Walker Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.