What Aspects of Their Memories Do College Students Most Want to Improve?

By Higbee, Kenneth L. | College Student Journal, December 2004 | Go to article overview

What Aspects of Their Memories Do College Students Most Want to Improve?


Higbee, Kenneth L., College Student Journal


Previous research investigated what aspects of their memories general audiences of people in memory-improvement seminars most wanted to improve. This research examined the same question among college students in memory-skills classes. Students rated the importance of each of 12 aspects of memory. The most important aspects were schoolwork, remembering what they read, remembering facts and details, and remembering people's names. The ratings showed few relationships with gender, grade point average, or year in school, suggesting that there might be more similarities than differences among different kinds of students in their memory concerns. The ratings also showed several similarities with the general audiences.

**********

Many studies have investigated the aspects of their memories for which people report failures and problems; this is usually done by measuring the reported frequency of occurrence of specified memory problems (cf., Gilewski & Zelinski, 1986). Higbee (2003) took a different approach to studying people's memory concerns, by investigating what aspects of memory were most important to people. A general audience of people attending a memory-improvement seminar responded to an open-ended question on what aspects of memory they most wanted to improve, and another general audience answered a questionnaire developed from those responses. The most important aspect was remembering people's names, and there were some gender and age differences in other aspects of memory. Other research has investigated what kinds of remembering are important to more-limited populations, such as the elderly (e.g., Leirer, Morrow, Sheikh, & Pariante, 1990; Reese, Cherry, & Norris, 1999).

The purpose of the present research was to examine the same question among college students, and to see how the responses of students compare with those of the general audiences. In a pilot study, 41 students in a memory-skills course answered the following question at the beginning of the course--"What are the main benefits you hope to get from taking a memory-improvement class? (That is, what are the memory questions or problems that you most want to have answered or solved?)." The answers to this question were categorized and tallied. The four categories with the most frequent answers were schoolwork (e.g., study skills, specific course material) = 51%, people's names and faces # = 24%, everyday tasks (e.g., things to do, where I put something) = 15%, and what I read = 10%. Chi-square comparisons between sub-groups found no significant differences between males and females, between low-GPA and high-GPA students, or among years in school.

The findings of no statistically significant differences among subgroups in the pilot study might have some practical significance, suggesting the possibility that there might be more similarities than differences in memory concerns among different kinds of students. However, another possible explanation might be the lack of statistical power in the comparisons, which led to the present study. This study was conducted to further investigate what aspects of their memories college students most want to improve, using interval-level data that would allow more-powerful statistical analyses than the chi-square tests used on the nominal data in the pilot study.

Method

Like the pilot study, the present study was a quasi-experiment. The participants were college students who were enrolled in another section of the memory-skills course at the same university. The course was taught by the author and is described elsewhere (Higbee, 1999). The 36 participants included 23 males and 13 females, ages 17-26 (M = 21.4, SD = 2.3), with 17 Psychology majors and the other 19 students representing 13 other majors. Years in school included 3 freshmen, 6 sophomores, 10 juniors, and 17 seniors.

At the beginning of the course, all participants completed the Memory Improvement Questionnaire (MIQ), which was developed from the categories of responses that had been given to the open-ended question that students had answered in the pilot study (as well as responses by the general audience of Higbee, 2003, Experiment 1). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Aspects of Their Memories Do College Students Most Want to Improve?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.