Celebrating and Starting Traditions

Security Management, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Celebrating and Starting Traditions


The ASIS International 50th Annual Seminar and Exhibits kicked off the Society's official celebration of its Golden Anniversary, which will continue through December 2005. Numerous events throughout the week focused on security, past and present, and on the benefits of ASIS membership shared through networking.

A golden jubilee. The celebration began at Monday's luncheon during which a special video on the history of the ASIS seminar and exhibits debuted. The flashback was compiled from photos and footage from the ASIS archives and looked back in time to memorable events in the history of the Seminar and Exhibits. From the first one-day "convention" in 1955 to the 21st century's multifaceted week full of security's finest speakers and exhibits, the video underscored the progress made by industry and ASIS International.

Additional videos debuted at other events during the week. The vignettes focused on the traditional events held during the seminar and exhibits: the Opening Ceremony, the President's Reception, the ASIS Foundation Dinner, educational programs, and exhibits. Individually, each video jogged the memories of attendees. Collectively, they constituted an unrivaled visual retrospective of ASIS and the security industry. (The vignettes can be viewed at www.asisonline.org.)

Attendees experienced two other slices of ASIS history, available at the Bookstore in Dallas. First, full (four-day) registrants received a complimentary copy of The Gold Standard: ASIS International Celebrates 50 Years of Advancing Security. This 280-page hardcover book chronicles the Society's development by decade based on interviews with those who were there. More than 100 historic photos from the ASIS archives highlight significant events in each of six chapters. Additional copies of this limited edition volume were available to members for $40 or to nonmembers for $60.

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In addition, two commemorative pins were available in the bookstore. The two bronze pins feature ASIS logos from years past. The original pin shows an eagle atop a factory, the typical employer of ASIS's founding fathers. The second pin features a globe with the traditional eagle. Both pins were available for $15 each. At next year's seminar and exhibits, a third specially designed anniversary pin will complete the set. (The book and the pins are available while supplies last at www.asisonline.org.)

The write stuff. Another anniversary project sponsored by ASIS International culminated at a special Anniversary Luncheon. Three high school students from the Dallas Independent School District received awards as winners of a school essay contest. The contest gave students a chance to write about security at their schools by answering one of two questions: "What Can My School Do to Make Its Students Safer?" or "What Can I Do to Make My School Safer?"

The winners were: Justin Buschardt, Grade 12 (first place), Warren Travis White High School, Joy Barnhart, principal; Octavia Benson, Grade 10 (second place), South Oak Cliff High School, Donald Moten, principal; and Shambrica Bean, Grade 10 (third place), Antonio Maceo Smith High School, Dwain Govan, principal.

A committee of security experts from the Dallas area evaluated the essays and chose the winners. The winners will receive commemorative plaques, and their schools will receive cash awards. The first-place school received a grand prize of $10,000. The second-place school received a $5,000 prize, and the third-place school received $2,000.

The funds are earmarked by ASIS for projects that benefit students directly such as purchasing books or computers for the library. The money could also be used to enhance security at the schools through either equipment or training.

A blast in the past. Networking remains a key element of the ASIS Seminar and Exhibits, and the traditional Monday night President's Reception has become a welcome break from the whirlwind occurring at the convention center. …

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