Foundation Report Examines the Security Industry

Security Management, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Foundation Report Examines the Security Industry


Thirty-five percent of companies located in the United States expect to invest more money in security over the upcoming year, and 34 percent plan to expand an existing security program, according to a preliminary report based on the first of a series of four surveys sponsored by the ASIS Foundation, Inc., and prepared by the Justice and Safety Center at Eastern Kentucky University.

The preliminary report showed that the majority of individual respondents within the security industry had completed at least a bachelor's degree, were an average of 49 years old, and had served 11 years in their current position. The average security budget for 2003, according to respondents, was more than $1 million, a 10 percent increase from 2002 numbers. Of the survey respondents, 18 percent expected an increase in security budgets for 2005 and only 3 percent expected budgets to decrease. Only 8 percent of companies planned to invest more in contract security officer services.

The most pressing security concern was computer/network security, cited by 46 percent of the respondents. Also important was liability insurance (40 percent) and employee theft (26 percent). These priorities were also reflected in questions about security purchases. Forty percent of U.S. companies plan to purchase computer/network security systems in 2005. In addition, 26 percent plan to invest in alarm systems, 24 percent in CCTV and surveillance products.

The data are further broken out by sector. For example, the survey found that companies in the retail sector are most likely to purchase alarm systems in the near future. Many types of companies, especially those in the finance, services, transportation, communications, and utilities sectors, plan on buying computer/network security systems.

Despite the 9-11 attacks, interaction with law enforcement remained steady. An overwhelming number of respondents (90 percent) said that security-related contacts with police had stayed the same since the terrorist attacks.

The survey also addressed the types of interactions security departments have within their own companies. For example, 25 percent of respondents said that they most frequently work with human resources, primarily on preemployment screening issues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Foundation Report Examines the Security Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.