Editorial

By Mallan, Kerry; Morgan, Wendy | Papers: Explorations into Children's Literature, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Mallan, Kerry, Morgan, Wendy, Papers: Explorations into Children's Literature


When The Who sang about teenage angst in the 60s, their rock anthem 'Talking about my Generation' captured the divide between youth and beyond. Today, another divide--the digital divide--speaks to the issues of access, capital, and input that follow digital technologies. Like the earlier 'me generation', the new millennium D(igital) generation remains enigmatic, its members variously praised for their technological wizardry, criticised for their self-absorption, and pathologised for their unsociability. The D generation does not comprise youth alone, but the young are more exposed than others to the influence of new media and digital technologies. And like previous youth generations, they are often viewed as degenerate. A cybernetic degeneration symbolising society's fears and cultural anxieties concerning the dehumanising prospects of technology appears most vividly in arguments about youth (Green & Bigum's 'aliens in the classroom' [1993] is an apt description in this respect). Such negative rhetoric presents a dystopic view that tempers the more utopian, but equally reductionist visions of new technologies.

And so the title of this issue, 'New Media and the D(igital) Generation' intends its own pun because for many people wired youth are indeed degenerate. In one sense, they form another kind of counter culture, offering a different radical alternative and social imagining to the psychedelic 60s and 70s. Whereas the new technologies of those previous times included hallucinogenic drugs as a technological prosthesis, today's cyberdelic culture offers increasingly new forms of technological prostheses that raise questions about what it means to be human. For many of us, they have become intimate, homely, familiar, implanted and no longer extensions of ourselves, but ourselves extended. Our machines are becoming more human, because they are a part of us, and we are a part of them. Consequently, we are discovering ways of being human that extend beyond familiar historical, cultural and social contexts. We know ourselves and are known within a shifting 'time-space compression' (Harvey 1990) where speed functions as a 'kind of sublime violence that brings an unparalleled thrill, but also a sense of human renewal, a renewal that will shatter the physical and sentimental limits of our subjectivity in order to make a wholly new experience of the world possible' (Mansfield 2000, p. 150).

Yet, to know oneself is as elusive as being able to identify our 'true' self. For centuries we have been told that our true, perennial selves as human beings are stored up in the book, particularly, literature. Instead, these depictions are imbued with culture and ideology, and are therefore subject to change. While literature in its traditional book form endures, it too is a dynamic technology that changes as it merges with digital technologies. The digital revolution will not 'just f-fade away' but will continue to explore new ways for coding, recording, manipulating, and transmitting information, and for diversifying its entertainment and pleasure-giving possibilities. Ultimately, the resilience and appeal of old technologies will be unable to survive without the life-extending capabilities of digital regeneration.

The papers in this special themed issue engage with these and related matters. If one were to read these papers hypertextually, one could follow a pathway, which connects to common concerns or foci that centre on issues about subjectivity, agency, control, and pleasure. We acknowledge the irony of a journal issue devoted to such matters presented in a traditional form restricted by print with its inherent linearity and book format; a form and format that encourage old reading habits that earlier and persistent print technologies have demanded of us. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editorial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.