Quarter Million FSI's for Rural Market Furniture Store: An Interview with Alan D. Dossenbach, Vice President and CEO

Editor & Publisher, September 12, 1992 | Go to article overview

Quarter Million FSI's for Rural Market Furniture Store: An Interview with Alan D. Dossenbach, Vice President and CEO


Dossenbach's Finer Furniture started in the basement of a building in Sanford, N.C., in 1946. Today it is a small market chain of eight furniture stores and a carpet center. Prices are middle to low. Room suite prices start at $399. Sofa prices top out at $699. Their customers are mainly blue-collar, plus some white-collar workers as well.

Dossenbach's handles their own credit. They feature furniture that will hold up well, and keep showing new furniture designs. Their advertising program is a great example of teamwork and creative planning.

One of their newspapers is the Sanford Herald -- 14,000 circulation on its way to 15,000. Jim Banks is the advertising manager. He helps the teamwork in Sanford.

"Years ago we bought preprinted circulars, but we had to buy too much stuff that didn't sell," reports Alan Dossenbach, "so we decided to do our own inserts and now we run 14 inserts a year.

"The price break on inserts is at 250,000. We can use 130,000 a month in all our markets and stores. So we order 260,000 and change the cover halfway through the run. For example, we will celebrate our 46th anniversary on our October insert and have a different cover for November. The rest of the copy stays the same.

"In addition, we try to have something in the paper at least once a week. Thursday is the best day, but Tuesday is a good day for carpet ads. All our stores are in small rural communities, so many people can get in during the week. Saturday is still our best day. …

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