Britain & Ireland: Report & Analysis, Evocation & Inspiration

By James, N.; Wynne-Jones, Stephanie | Antiquity, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Britain & Ireland: Report & Analysis, Evocation & Inspiration


James, N., Wynne-Jones, Stephanie, Antiquity


On Britain, this quarter, we have received both technical site reports and, from Tempus, syntheses on districts for the amateur aficionado. Starting with the latter, we find, on one hand, two accounts arranged around conventional narratives stretching, in chronological steps, from the Mesolithic to today and, on the other, an experiment in divining values for various eras in the same stretch of time. Then comes a thoughtful foil with a conventional presentation, another experiment on deducing values, and, to complement the whole set, a welcome contribution on methodology.

MIKE PARKER PEARSON, NEIL SHARPLES & JIM SYMONDS with JACQUI MULVILLE, JOHN RAVEN, HELEN SMITH & ALEX WOOLF. South Uist: archaeology and history of a Hebridean island. 224 pages, 114 figures, 16 colour illustrations. 2004. Stroud: Tempus; 0-7524-2905-1 paperback 17.99 [pounds sterling].

BILL BEVAN. The upper Derwent: 10,000 years in a Peak District valley. 192 pages, 86 figures. 2004. Stroud: Tempus; 0-7524-2903-5 paperback 17.99 [pounds sterling].

MARK EDMONDS. The Langdales: landscape and prehistory in a Lakeland valley. 224 pages, figures. 2004. Stroud: Tempus; 0-7524-3238-9 paperback 15.99 [pounds sterling].

JOHN BEAVIS. Dorset's World Heritage coast: an archaeological guide. 160 pages, 104 figures, 16 colour photographs. 2004. Stroud: Tempus; 0-7524-2545-5 paperback 15.99 [pounds sterling].

ADRIAN M. CHADWICK (ed.). Stories from the landscape: archaeologies of inhabitation (BAR International Set. 1238). ix+281 pages, figures, plates. 2004. Oxford: Archaeopress; 1-84171-597-2 paperback.

STEPHEN RIPPON with JO CLARK & PETER REA. Historic landscape analysis: deciphering the countryside (Practical Handbooks in Archaeology No. 16). xii+ 166 pages, 52 figures, 7 colour plates, 5 tables. 2004. York: Council for British Archaeology; 1-902771-44-3 paperback 9.50 [pounds sterling].

South Uist and Derwent are both approachable landscape histories. South Uist goes all the way with the emigrants to Canada and concludes with a creative and archaeologically informed essay on 'tradition and change', 'innovation and

retrenchment' (p. 194), 'mainstream or ... margins', 'sunwise' living, and the quality of life. The authors remark on technical discoveries too, including continuity of township sites over 2000 years. Derwent is less conceptually adventurous but also effective as a general introduction, if a little informal with the reader and, hence, vague on problems in the record. Strong, however, on the local history, it takes its story up to the Mass Trespass (1932) and the flooding of the valley by a dam, and concludes with a pointed summary of current scenarios for managing the area in future. Both books provide notes on sites to visit.

Langdales seeks to instil something of the Romantics' reflectiveness (when others, like nephew WORDSWORTH [below] still sought 'a changeless classical paradise' over 'volatile national boundaries' [pp. 15, 13]). 'What was it like?', for Neolithic axe makers, woodsmen in the 1700s, or weekenders in the 1930s or, indeed, how is it today, to scale the rocks as sport and thought? Surely the Langdales were always 'powerful' (p. 92). The author's fancies are unencumbered by archaeological technicality but, underneath his affected style, there is more to learn here about the Norse economy than in South Uist. On 'understanding' landscape, compare BEAVIS, like whom the author is worried about walkers' depredations of the archaeology; and for this quarter's most effective conceit, see Dr EDMONDS's last two pages. Outstanding photographs and, as in Derwent, some clever graphics are related well to the text. The Langdales includes a good bibliography. Each of these books springs from substantial recent research of the writers' own and their colleagues but Dr EDMONDS makes little explicitly of that.

The core of Dorset's World is a compactly produced, clearly written and observant guided walk supported by photographs which are, on the whole, effective, many of them annotated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Britain & Ireland: Report & Analysis, Evocation & Inspiration
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.