Latin America Moves Left: As Communist Groups Exert Increased Influence in Latin America, Threats to the U.S. Are Coalescing and Becoming Increasingly Evident

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, January 24, 2005 | Go to article overview

Latin America Moves Left: As Communist Groups Exert Increased Influence in Latin America, Threats to the U.S. Are Coalescing and Becoming Increasingly Evident


Jasper, William F., The New American


Thanks in large measure to policies of the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and Inter-American Development Bank, virtually all of our hemispheric neighbors are bankrupt and hopelessly mired in debt. Unfortunately, the IMF-WB-IDB policies that have caused the social and economic havoc in these countries have been falsely billed as "free market" reforms. Not surprisingly, this has discredited genuine free market reforms and driven many of the disenchanted and desperate into the arms of the Castroite Left. The following capsules provide a troubling look at disturbing political developments in some of the countries south of the border.

Argentina: The fourth most populous nation in Latin America with the third largest economy, Argentina under President Nestor Kirchner is following the Marxist tilt of Brazil's President Lula and Venezuela's President Chavez. Elected in 2003, he was the sixth president sworn in in 18 months, following Argentina's economic meltdown. With his Partido Justicialista controlling both houses of Parliament and 16 of the 24 provincial governorships, he launched purges of the military, police, and the courts in order to stack the system with his own ideologues. Kirchner quickly established ties to Cuba and dramatically expanded relations with China.

Bahamas: Only 65 miles from Florida, these islands usually conjure images of resorts and sun-splashed beaches. But the Bahamas have become a strategic chokehold target for Communist China. The Hong Kong-based Hutchison Whampoa, Ltd., China's global maritime stalking horse, operates and controls one of the world's largest and most modern seaports in the capital city of Freeport. Bahamian Prime Minister Perry Christie paid a visit to China in August 2004 seeking an expansion of Chinese investment in his country.

Brazil: By population, economy, technology, and natural resources, Brazil is Latin America's giant. President Luiz "Lula" da Silva, a longtime Communist--and together with Fidel Castro a founder of the terrorist cabal known as the Sao Paulo Forum--has pledged to make Brazil the region's first nuclear weapons power. Soon after his 2002 election, Lula announced he would stop Brazil's adherence to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. "Why is it that someone asks me to put down my weapons and only keep a slingshot while he keeps a cannon pointed at me?" he asked. "Brazil will only be respected in the world when it turns into an economic, technological and military power." With a robust nuclear energy program and nuclear weapons research facilities--not to mention military and technological ties to Russia and China--Lula could make good on this threat.

Chile: President Ricardo Lagos and his Socialist Party, often described as "moderate," are showing their true colors. Last December, the Lagos government indicted former President Augusto Pinochet, charging him with kidnapping and murdering political opponents. The 89-year-old Pinochet, in fragile physical and mental health, has been the target of leftists worldwide since his 1973 coup d'etat overthrew the blossoming Communist dictatorship of Salvador Allende. Communists and leftists of every stripe have flocked back to Chile, including Michelle Bachelet, who spent several years in Communist East Germany. Bachelet is being muted as a top candidate to become Chile's first female president, at the head of the Socialist Party ticket.

Colombia: On January 1, terrorists of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) massacred 17 peasants--including 4 children and 6 women--who were attending a New Year's party in Arauca Province near the Venezuela border. Thus, FARC continues a bloody legacy that has ravaged Colombia for more than four decades.

Cuba: After having been declared irrelevant for years, aging Communist dictator Fidel Castro is enjoying his newfound influence throughout Latin America. where left-wing regimes now dominate the major countries in the region. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Latin America Moves Left: As Communist Groups Exert Increased Influence in Latin America, Threats to the U.S. Are Coalescing and Becoming Increasingly Evident
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.