Africa/UN: Knives out for Kofi Annan; Recent Indications from Washington Have Exposed the Bush Administration's Desire to See the UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, Removed from Office. This Is Happening at a Time When the UN Is Seeking to Reshape Itself for the 21st Century. Stuart Price Reports

By Price, Stuart | New African, January 2005 | Go to article overview

Africa/UN: Knives out for Kofi Annan; Recent Indications from Washington Have Exposed the Bush Administration's Desire to See the UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, Removed from Office. This Is Happening at a Time When the UN Is Seeking to Reshape Itself for the 21st Century. Stuart Price Reports


Price, Stuart, New African


It was Kofi Annan himself who, in his address to the UN General Assembly in September 2003, admitted that "the United Nations had reached a fork in the road." After the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on America, the UN, as an organisation, needed to be modernised to keep pace with an ever-changing and increasingly globalised world.

It is for this reason that the findings of a review probing the UN's effectiveness entitled A More Secure World: Our Shared Responsibility was released at the beginning of December, outlining proposals for change. The High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change has set out "a bold, new vision of collective security for the 21st century."

It highlights that in the world today, conflict, genocide, poverty, infectious diseases, environmental degradation, weapons of mass destruction, terrorism and transnational organised crime are the greatest threats to peace and stability.

To meet these challenges, the panel said the UN's existing institutions should work better. "It will take resources commensurate with the scale of the challenges ahead, commitments that are long term and sustained, and, most of all, it will take leadership--from within states, and between them," the panel said.

Yet, the man who is leading the reform agenda of the UN, Secretary General Kofi Annan, has come under attack by a Bush Administration which wants him to relinquish his post. Norm Coleman, the Republican chairman of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which is probing allegations about the UN oil-for-food programme in Iraq, has already accused Annan of "incompetence and mismanagement."

The programme was established after the first Gulf War in 1991 to allow Iraq, which was then under economic sanctions, to sell oil and use the profits to buy food and medical supplies. It is alleged that the former Iraqi president, Saddam Hussein, skimmed U$6.7bn of the proceeds and profited from an additional U$13.7bn through smuggling oil out of the country.

So how does Kofi Annan bear responsibility for this? The link lies in his son, Kojo, who was on the payroll of the Swiss firm, Cotecna, for consulting work in Africa. The same firm also inspected goods entering Iraq under the oil-for-food programme. Kojo was on their payroll until early 2004.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

However, six separate investigations into the oil-for-food programme have not found any wrongdoing on Kojo's part, and no formal charges have been brought. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Africa/UN: Knives out for Kofi Annan; Recent Indications from Washington Have Exposed the Bush Administration's Desire to See the UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, Removed from Office. This Is Happening at a Time When the UN Is Seeking to Reshape Itself for the 21st Century. Stuart Price Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.