Books: Roman Arnie; CONN IGGULDEN JULIUS CAESAR AUTHOR FEARS MUSCLEMAN COULD STAR IN FILM OF HIS BOOK EMPEROR the Field of Swords (HarperCollins, Pounds 10.99)

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), January 30, 2005 | Go to article overview

Books: Roman Arnie; CONN IGGULDEN JULIUS CAESAR AUTHOR FEARS MUSCLEMAN COULD STAR IN FILM OF HIS BOOK EMPEROR the Field of Swords (HarperCollins, Pounds 10.99)


Byline: LORNE JACKSON

HERE'S the story. Kind of. Classical times: a vast Roman army has landed in Deal, Kent. The troops are led by one of the greatest military commanders in history, Julius Caesar.

His men are ready to do his bidding and conquer the small island off the coast of Europe but first the mighty leader will address his warriors.

Chomping on a sizzling cigar, he adjusts his Ray-Ban sunglasses and hoists his Uzi machine-gun aloft. In a booming, Germanic voice he thunders: 'Friends, Roman's countrymen... hasta la vista, baby! Der ver some peoples say I nevva be muchava leada. Vell, I just gat one ting ta say ta dem. I alvays knew dat I'D BE BACK!'

Of course such a silly scenario doesn't bare thinking about.

But Conn Iggulden admits duringbleak moments that it's his nightmare. He imagines that the film being based on his majestic series of Emperor novels, which describe the life of Julius Caesar, will culminate in a movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger.

After all, if Colin Farrell can ham it up as Alexander the Great, then no historical figure is safe from getting basted on the spitroast of ridicule.

'An option has been taken on my books by a film production company and a script's being written at the moment,' reveals Conn.

'But I've had a few nightmares about ArnoldSchwarzenegger in the lead role. It might seem ridiculous but in the 1960s Rex Harrison played Julius Caesar.

'Can you imagine? He was Dr Dolittle! Dr Dolittle becoming ruler of Rome, Dr Dolittle defeating the Gauls, Dr Dolittle invading Britain - how silly can you get?' SowhowouldConn like to playthe lead role?

'I'm not sure,' he says. 'My wife thinks JudeLawwouldbe terrific. That's probably just because he's goodlooking. But maybe it's not a bad idea.

Law's thin, which would be accurate. Caesar marched30 miles adaywhenhe was campaigning so he'd have been similar to a Tour de France cyclist - skinny and wiry.'

Conn's latest tale about Caesar, The Field Of Swords, is the third in the series, and the author has journeyed with his protagonist from boyhood to battle campaigns in Britain. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Books: Roman Arnie; CONN IGGULDEN JULIUS CAESAR AUTHOR FEARS MUSCLEMAN COULD STAR IN FILM OF HIS BOOK EMPEROR the Field of Swords (HarperCollins, Pounds 10.99)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.