AIDS Efforts Improved, but Still Lacking; Report Aims to Extend Drug Treatment

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

AIDS Efforts Improved, but Still Lacking; Report Aims to Extend Drug Treatment


Byline: John Zaracostas, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

GENEVA - Global efforts to extend drug treatment to millions of AIDS sufferers - nearly three-quarters of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa - picked up momentum in 2004, but major obstacles still need to be overcome, international health officials said last week.

"Many countries need to increase their efforts, money is short, and international organizations need to become much faster in assisting countries," concluded the latest "3 by 5" progress report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), published Jan. 26.

The "3 by 5" objective, announced in 2003, is to ensure that 3 million people living with AIDS receive treatment by the end of 2005. The goal is projected to cost as much as $3.8 billion to achieve.

The top leaders of WHO, Dr. Lee Jong-wook; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Dr. Richard Feachem; UNAIDS, Dr. Peter Piot; and Randall Tobias, the U.S. global AIDS coordinator, praised the advances attained in AIDS treatment last year at a news briefing last week in Davos, Switzerland.

"We salute countries that have shown us treatment is possible and can be scaled up quickly, even in the poorest setting," Dr. Lee said.

Said Mr. Tobias: "The heart and soul of President Bush's emergency plan for AIDS relief is to work shoulder to shoulder with host governments and our other partners in those nations in support of the national strategy of each country."

By the end of 2004, about 700,000 AIDS patients in poor countries were receiving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment, up 75 percent from a year earlier and from 440,000 last July.

Though a gain, the 700,000 figure is just 12 percent of the estimated 5.8 million adults in poor countries who need ARV therapy. Of the 5.1 million who still lack ARV treatment, said the "3 by 5" report, 72 percent live in sub-Saharan Africa and 22 percent in Asia.

In sub-Saharan Africa, the WHO and UNAIDS in their latest "3 by 5" progress report estimate that the number of people receiving ARV treatment "has doubled over six months from 150,000 to 310,000" - about 8 percent of adults who need such therapy.

The report highlights that progress varies among countries. Botswana, Namibia and Uganda showed the largest increases in ARV treatment among African countries.

In Botswana, the number of facilities offering ARV therapy nearly doubled from 12 in 2003 to 23 sites at the end of 2004, covering all but a few districts in the country.

By March 2004, Botswana also had trained 2,212 health workers, the report said, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, counselors and other health workers. As a result, of the estimated 75,000 people ages 15 to 49 needing therapy, half were receiving treatment at the end of 2004. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

AIDS Efforts Improved, but Still Lacking; Report Aims to Extend Drug Treatment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.