Messy Democracy Here and Abroad

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Messy Democracy Here and Abroad


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Tony Blankley's column "Iraqi ballots and bombs" (Op-Ed, Jan. 26) makes many valid points about the importance of democracy in Iraq and the significance of the Iraqi elections to the ultimate achievement of a free society in that war-ravaged country.

But Mr. Blankley's partisan rhetoric went way over the line of acceptable political discourse when he attempted to equate terrorist Abu Musab Zarqawi's violent opposition to those elections with the opposition of "Sen. Barbara Boxer and the rest of Mr. Bush's political opponents" to the president's policies in Iraq.

Mr. Blankley's column accurately describes Zarqawi as "the infidel-beheading terrorist butcher of Baghdad." Can he really believe that Zarqawi's violent and ruthless attempts to sow the seeds of anarchy and civil war in Iraq are of a piece with the words of Mrs. Boxer and others who oppose President Bush's policies? To make such a comparison is, on its face, absurd.

And who are the "opponents" of Mr. Bush to whom Mr. Blankley refers so caustically? The implicit suggestion is that they are all Democrats - but that is hardly true. What of Republican Sens. …

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