Confederate Retreat; Incursion of Urban Growth Threatens Stately Landmark of Civil War Capital

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Confederate Retreat; Incursion of Urban Growth Threatens Stately Landmark of Civil War Capital


Byline: Christina Bellantoni, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

RICHMOND - An elite neighborhood where stately manors once housed top Confederate officials is slowly being replaced by parking garages and industrial high-rises, prompting historians to talk about moving the Museum and White House of the Confederacy.

Museum attendance has dwindled in recent years because construction projects and urban growth in the Court End neighborhood have deterred history buffs from visiting the landmark, museum officials say.

"There has been a lot of building taking place, and the ambience of the setting has been compromised," said Robert H. Lamb, a member of the museum's board of trustees. "I think Jefferson Davis would be shocked if he saw what was now surrounding the garden. It's still a wonderful building, but a lot depends on the whole experience when someone comes to visit something."

Built in 1818, the White House of the Confederacy was the most esteemed building in the city's Court End neighborhood. Overlooking the city's Shockhoe Valley, the White House served as a primary residence for Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the Civil War.

Today, the views of the stately house and its museum next door are blocked by parking decks and the expanding Medical College of Virginia, which is building a multilevel tower. The urban aspects, museum officials have said, have made the landmarks barely visible to passers-by.

That is why several Virginia lawmakers this year have proposed legislation that would allow the state to conduct a study to determine the feasibility of moving the landmark buildings to a spot that might attract more visitors.

A House Rules Committee subcommittee approved the legislation Jan. 27, and the full committee will consider it within the next week. The study would cost Virginia about $8,800.

Delegate Bill Janis, Goochland Republican who authored the legislation, and others from the Richmond area said the restored mansion is one of the state's "greatest educational and tourist attractions."

If approved, the legislature would create a study subcommittee that likely would include Richmond Mayor L. Douglas Wilder, five state delegates, three state senators, museum officials, and a representative of the Virginia Commonwealth University, whose medical campus and hospital have expanded in the area.

"It's no longer compatible with the nature of the city," Mr. Janis said. "If this organization goes bankrupt, because of the historic nature of the building, it's not like we could take a wrecking ball to it. If we don't do something and their ability to meet their bottom line dwindles, Richmond or Virginia will have to assume responsibility with a much greater expense to the taxpayers."

Delegate Viola O. Baskerville, Richmond Democrat who initially co-sponsored the legislation, has taken her name off the bill. She said she was concerned the state would spend money on the museum, which is a non-state agency. …

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