Campaign's Over

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Campaign's Over


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Campaign's over

What's become of Teresa Heinz Kerry?

Preceding its Women Who Make a Difference Awards Dinner on March 1, the National Council for Research on Women is featuring "a conversation with Teresa Heinz," chairwoman of Heinz Family Philanthropies and, up until Election Day, the highly visible better half of Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry.

"Teresa Heinz will speak to her commitment to women's economic security, including Social Security and retirement," writes the council, not bothering to mention her married name in several references.

"I just checked, and she no longer uses her [entire] last name; only during the [presidential] campaign did she use Kerry," the council's Tamara Rodriguez Reichberg told Inside the Beltway upon our inquiry.

Leading by example

When a political panel discussion in Washington this week turned to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's drifting to the center of the polity - including her recent praise of the Clinton administration for helping lower the number of abortions performed in this country - former Ambassador Richard Carlson, who was seated in the audience, couldn't help but recall a joke he'd heard that morning.

It had to do with Mrs. Clinton's recent fainting spell in Buffalo, N.Y., and ... well, what might have been behind it (come to think of it, the former first lady wouldn't be the oldest woman on the planet to carry a baby full term).

As one might expect, ladies in the audience were visibly aghast at the mere thought, while the few men in attendance who weren't laughing offered a polite smile.

Suffice it to say, Mr. Carlson, former president and CEO of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, got the panel's undivided attention.

Fair warning

Chicago-based Tribune Media Services (TMS) is cautioning its lineup of nationally syndicated columnists not to get caught in the same honey trap as Armstrong Williams.

TMS dropped syndication of the black pundit's column after he acknowledged accepting $240,000 from the Bush administration to promote its education-reform law.

"Recent news events have cast a national spotlight on the subject of media credibility," TMS Vice President John C. Twohey writes in a two-page letter to columnists, this one among them. …

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