Protest; Parking, and the Daily Battle with Traffic Wardens, Continue to Arouse Strong Emotions. Here Are Your Tales of Ticketing Madness

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

Protest; Parking, and the Daily Battle with Traffic Wardens, Continue to Arouse Strong Emotions. Here Are Your Tales of Ticketing Madness


CAN YOU BELIEVE IT?

AM extremely concerned about the speed with which Lambeth and Wandsworth parking attendants swoop, often in groups of two or three. I have a dodgy hip and it's a fairly slow shuffle for me to walk to the payanddisplay meter.

I recently visited St George's hospital to see a patient, and the nearest machine wasn't working, so I went to the next one. A warden watched me walk to the meter and was filling out a ticket as I returned to my car. She was exceptionally verbally abusive. I gently reminded her that I was entirely legal in my actions. I received further abuse. I asked for her number and she quickly turned away, covered her epaulette and ran across the road.

I am sure that parking attendants do not have the authority to hassle and threaten people who have committed no offence other than moving slowly to get their ticket.

Professor Robert Kerwin, Camberwell, SE5.

*YOUR report (Parking danger zone, 27 January) seems to confirm that wardens in Lambeth are out to get our money.

Voltaire Road, SW4, has parking restrictions from 8.30am to 8.30pm.

I parked at 8.40pm to visit a relative. I was aware of the restriction times, but I was not able to park entirely within the bay. I was, however, given a ticket on the basis that I was "parked in a restricted street in prescribed hours".

I wasn't prepared to accept this so I appealed against the charge.

As I didn't want to fall foul of the non-compliance penalty I enclosed a cheque. This has been presented for payment, but I have not had the courtesy of a reply to my appeal.

Idris M Jones, by email.

LIVE in Revelstoke Road, which is the boundary between Merton and Wandsworth.

I have a parking permit from Merton and my car is parked outside my house on the Merton side.

Last September, a Wandsworth parking attendant issued me with a penalty notice, alleging that my car did not display a permit. I wrote immediately to challenge this. Last week I received a rejection of my "representations", in which Wandsworth council insists that the penalty notice was correctly issued because the warden claimed that no permit was displayed. …

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Protest; Parking, and the Daily Battle with Traffic Wardens, Continue to Arouse Strong Emotions. Here Are Your Tales of Ticketing Madness
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