Inventing the Black Consumer Market

Ebony, November 1992 | Go to article overview

Inventing the Black Consumer Market


TODAY, as retailers and advertising agencies scramble to find ways to appeal to Black consumers, one might assume that corporate America's belief in the value and vitality of that market segment is deeply rooted.

Yet, in the comparatively unenlightened age in which Johnson Publishing Co. was launched, the notion that Black consumers were worth the time and attention of White advertisers was practically revolutionary. It took JPC founder and chairman John H. Johnson to demonstrate that Blacks not only shop, but are also discriminating, status-conscious consumers who, on the average, purchase more name-brand, top-of-the-line products than their White counterparts.

The upshot ofJPCs pioneering efforts was the "discovery"--some experts say invention--of the Black consumer market, an untapped gold mine of customers.

Long ignored by many White merchants and manufacturers, Black consumers are now estimated to have, in aggregate, more than $270 billion worth of buying power, according to statistics provided by Andrew Brimmer & Associates, a Washington, D.C., consulting and marketing firm. And, even in the face of unequal opportunity, the persistence of racism, and disproportionate representation among the nation's poor, experts predict that Black America's collective disposable income--barring the total collapse of the economy--will grow to nearly $650 billion by the year 2000 when a non White majority will be the principal consumers in the nation's largest metropolitan areas.

"Despite the presence of an urban class that is mired in poverty, the Black middle class has continued to grow in numbers and buying power," says Dr. Brimmer, "and will be an even more substantial force in the marketplace by the turn of the century."

Still, convincing prospective advertisers of the viability of the Black consumer market has not been easy. Johnson Publishing Co. 's crusade to open corporate America's eyes began almost at the inception of the company. As far back as 1947--when scarcely an ad featuring or appealing to Blacks could be found in any medium--Publisher Johnson was writing in EBONY's Backstage column about the enormity of the market and the boon that could be reaped by any advertiser smart enough to target it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Inventing the Black Consumer Market
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.