AIDS, Foreign Assistance Big Budget Winners

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

AIDS, Foreign Assistance Big Budget Winners


Byline: David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

AIDS prevention and overseas assistance would get major increases under President Bush's budget, which calls for a big boost in foreign aid programs even as U.S. farmers, veterans and train riders face cutbacks.

The State Department and U.S. foreign assistance and diplomacy programs proved to be unexpected winners in the fiscal 2006 federal budget released by Mr. Bush on Monday.

Private aid groups that had been critical of the administration's policies found little to criticize in a budget that would increase foreign aid spending by nearly 16 percent, to $22.8 billion.

Although the administration wants to eliminate or sharply reduce about 150 programs in the federal government in a bid to cut the deficit, none of the programs comes under the $33.6 billion international affairs budget.

State Department officials said the spending boost at a time of general belt-tightening reflected Mr. Bush's focus on winning the global war on terrorism through aid, diplomacy and the promotion of democracy abroad, the theme of his inaugural address last month.

"This is a budget and a department that is focusing on transformational democracy around the world," a senior State Department official said.

Two of the biggest increases come in two of Mr. Bush's foreign policy priorities: the Millennium Challenge Corp. (MCC) and HIV/AIDS prevention.

The MCC is designed as a fundamental overhaul of U.S. foreign economic aid, directing funds to low-income countries that have embraced strong market-oriented reforms and institutions. Mr. Bush asked Congress for $3 billion for the MCC for the fiscal year beginning in October, double the current funding. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

AIDS, Foreign Assistance Big Budget Winners
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.