Bush Continues Outreach to Blacks; Aim Is to Build on 2004 Gains

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

Bush Continues Outreach to Blacks; Aim Is to Build on 2004 Gains


Byline: Bill Sammon, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Bush yesterday told hundreds of black leaders in a meeting at the White House that his policies would help black Americans, an overture that was reprised hours later by the new chairman of the Republican Party.

The moves were part of a concerted effort to build on small but significant Republican gains in black support during last year's election. Mr. Bush won 11 percent of black votes, up from 9 percent in 2000, according to exit polls.

"We're committed to continuing to grow that percentage, and we recognize that it's going to require a long investment," said Republican National Committee Chairman Ken Mehlman, who last night kicked off a series of his own outreach meetings with black leaders.

"I strongly believe that if we lay out our policies and lay out our vision, that we have a tremendous opportunity," he said.

Mr. Bush, whose national approval rating yesterday reached 57 percent, the highest in more than a year, sought to capitalize on that popularity by arguing that his first four years in office had benefited blacks.

"Today, the minority homeownership rate in America is at an all-time high - that's incredibly good news," he said. "African Americans can pass on a better life and a better nation to their children and their grandchildren, and that's what we want in America."

The president's 15-minute speech in the East Room was interrupted 17 times by applause from an audience that included black clergy, veterans, business leaders and members of Congress. Among those in attendance were Sen. Barack Obama, Illinois Democrat, and Rep. Melvin Watt, North Carolina Democrat and chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus.

"We will continue to enforce laws against racial discrimination in education and housing and public accommodations," Mr. Bush said. "We'll continue working to spread hope and opportunity to African Americans with no inheritance but their character - by giving them greater access to capital and education."

Hours after the president's pep talk, Mr. Mehlman held the first in a series of meetings with blacks "to highlight how Republican policies are empowering people of color," according to the RNC.

Mr. Mehlman, who was the president's re-election campaign manager, was joined by Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, a black Republican, at last night's session in predominantly black Prince George's County.

"My message tonight is, if you give us a chance, we'll give you a choice," Mr. Mehlman said in an interview before the closed meeting. "A choice in politics, a choice in education, a choice to own your own small business, to have a nest egg you can pass along to your children when you retire, a choice in health care.

"In so many different areas, our policies offer access to the American dream to folks who haven't had access," he added. "If you're looking at which of the parties gives folks the ladder up, I think that the Republican policies today are those policies. …

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