Combining Ancient and Modern Medicine Makes for Better Health and More Jobs

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 2, 2005 | Go to article overview

Combining Ancient and Modern Medicine Makes for Better Health and More Jobs


Byline: Rachel Baruch Yackley

"Not only does this mean better care for all patients, but it opens up a whole new range of occupations for people wanting to work in medicine"

In the medical world, "integrated medicine" is a new term we are starting to hear, more and more.

If you are not yet familiar with integrated medicine, it is the combination of what has been referred to as alternative medicine and western medicine - that with which we are all familiar.

Integrated medicine combines the latest medical advances with ancient healing systems such as acupuncture, ayurveda, reiki, Chinese herbology, and much more.

Not only does this mean better care for all patients, but it opens up a whole new range of occupations for people wanting to work in medicine.

Different types of modalities

A long list of available alternative therapies exist, many of which are now recognized practices that are accepted by conventional medical doctors as valid treatments. Among these are: chiropractic; homeopathy; massage; naturopathy; traditional Chinese medicine; aromatherapy; hydrotherapy; reflexology; shiatsu; yoga; and many more (an extensive list can be found at www.naturalhealers.com).

This won't hurt a bit

Oriental medicine includes acupuncture, which, when practiced by a trained and licensed acupuncturist, is a safe, highly successful treatment, which really doesn't hurt a bit.

Using an energetic rather than a biochemical model of medicine, ancient Chinese practitioners discovered that energy flows along pathways called meridians, each of which is associated with a physiological system and an internal organ. They believed dis-ease occurs when a deficiency or imbalance of energy exists in the meridians.

Acupuncture points are specific sites along the meridians, and each point effects the vital energy, or qi, which passes through that point. Modern science has actually been able to measure the electrical charge at these points, and has corroborated on the locations of the meridians.

Support from the big guys

Georgiy Lifschits is a licensed acupuncturist at Gathering Valley Center in Skokie - an acupuncture, massage, and Chinese herbs clinic. He has been a practicing acupuncturist for 10 years in the United States, and prior to that, for 15 years in Russia.

Over the past 10 years, Lifschits has experienced a definite increase in clients, which he said is due, in part, to recognition of this therapy by insurance companies. In fact, Lifschits was able to finally join an insurance network about four years ago. This acknowledgment and support from insurance companies has been becoming available for several alternative therapies.

According to the Natural Healers web site, the World Health Organization (WHO) now recognizes acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine as valid treatments for numerous common ailments including: peptic ulcer; constipation; anorexia; urinary tract infections; infertility; premenstrual syndrome; respiratory disorders; disorders of the bones, muscles, joints and nervous system; circulatory disorders such as angina pectoris and arteriosclerosis; emotional and psychological disorders; additions; and much more. …

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