Providence Summit Participants

Addiction Professional, July 2004 | Go to article overview

Providence Summit Participants


David R. Anderson

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA)

Daphne Baille

TASC, Inc.

Andrea Barthwell, M.D.

White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)

Roger Bensinger

Bencorp

Kathryn Cates-Wessel

Physicians and Lawyers for National Drug Policy

H. Westley Clark, M.D., J.D., M.P.H.

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT)

Linda Hay Crawford

Therapeutic Communities of America

Christopher Crosby

The Watershed Treatment Programs

John de Miranda

National Association on Alcohol, Drugs and Disability

Dona M. Dmitrovic

Johnson Institute

Pat Ford-Roegner

NAADAC, The Association for Addiction Professionals

Karen Freeman-Wilson

National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP)

Peter D. Friedmann, M.D., M.P.H.

Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA)

Lewis Gallant, Ph.D.

National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors (NASADAD)

Larry Gentilello, M.D.

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Elizabeth George

North American Training Institute

Alan L. Gordon, M.D.

Butler Hospital

Pamela Greenberg, M.P.P.

American Managed Behavioral Healthcare Association (AMBHA)

Anara Guard

Join Together

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Ronald J. Hunsicker, D.Min.

National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP)

Barry W. Karlin

CRC Health Group

Suzanne Kerrigan

Alkermes, Inc.

Don Kuhl

The Change Companies

Robyn Leary

The Recovery Channel

David C. Lewis, M.D.

Physicians and Lawyers for National Drug Policy

Ginna Marston

Partnership for a Drug-Free America

Carol McDaid

Capitol Decisions

Patrick McEneaney

Phoenix House Foundation

Eileen McGrath, J.D.

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

Tom McHale

Faces and Voices of Recovery

Vanda Milman, Ph. …

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Providence Summit Participants
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