Western Management Training in Poland: A Case Study

By Ryan, Leo V., C. S. V. | Review of Business, Spring 1992 | Go to article overview

Western Management Training in Poland: A Case Study


Ryan, Leo V., C. S. V., Review of Business


Academics, consultants and functional specialists have recognized the great need for developing managers in all the countries of the former Soviet bloc and have flocked to those countries in great numbers. This need has become the focus of western attention. One example is the U.S. Congressional Aid Program for Poland which contains a provision for management education.

In Poland. many persons speak humorously, sometimes amusingly and sometimes cynically, about the "Marriott Brigade." They refer to the host of short time specialists who descend upon Warsaw, lodge at the very expensive and very American Marriott, deliver advice or a lecture, and remain safely isolated at the Marriott until they return home. What Poland needs is less short term and more sustained efforts and management development programs in cities outside the capital.

Numerous U.S. colleges and universities have responded to the opportunity for cooperative efforts and joint programs in management development, and numerous models of cooperation have begun to emerge. This article will define some of the options, identify some existing models of cooperation, indicate some of the universities involved and conclude with a case study illustration of the variety of cooperation programs designed and undertaken by DePaul University.

Toward the end of 1990 more than thirty existing Polish institutions had begun to offer training in management, industry and commerce. Most schools are oriented toward general management, but some programs specialize in capital markets. securities, privatization. corporate restructuring and entrepreneurship. Many training programs are short term. Some of these programs are designed to prepare managers in state enterprises for the transition to privatization. Other programs take longer (10 to 12 months), while the newly developing business curricula in the state universities are long term programs (up to 5 years).

In Poland today the various models of management training include:

1. Management Schools with country links, i.e. Polish American Business School or the Polish-German Business School.

2. Newly established training centers for business and industry i.e. International Business School, Warsaw; International Management School and International Management Centre of Warsaw University.

3. Newly established University Departments of Business Studies, i.e. Business Administration, School of Law and Administration, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan; Business Studies, Catholic University, Lublin; and the Department of Organization and Management, University of Lodz.

4. Separate schools of business linked to an established university, i.e. Torun Business School affiliated with Nicholas Copernicus University, Torun.

5. Separate schools of business with loose affiliations with specific academic institutions, i.e. Lublin Business School with Catholic University of Lublin. The "loose affiliation" here means a tie primarily because some of the Lublin Business School faculty are also present or former Catholic University faculty.

6. Essentially private (proprietary) schools organized with faculty from a specific university but not formally a part of the university. Faculty from the University of Lodz are affiliated with two satellite centers. The Business School at Belchatow is, in fact, organized by the local newspaper. The School of Management at Tomasztow-Mas is also privately organized and staffed by University of Lodz faculty. In Poland, faculty often teach at more than one institution. Today, because of the shortage of faculty qualified to teach free market economics and to relate Western European or American experiences in the functional areas of business, those few faculty are in great demand.

7. A local foundation is established by individuals, or by a group of business leaders who, in turn, establish a "not-for-profit" but proprietary school of management, i. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Western Management Training in Poland: A Case Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.