Fiction in 2005

New Statesman (1996), January 24, 2005 | Go to article overview

Fiction in 2005


We've had McEwan, Munro and Murakami--but there is much else to look forward to in what promises to be an unusually good year for fiction. Here is a guide to the coming months

Anita Brookner * Leaving Home (February, Viking)

Another year, another Brookner novel. Her 23rd concerns, not for the first time, an Englishwoman in France.

Dan Jacobson * All for Love (February, Hamish Hamilton)

Jacobson's first novel in 12 years. A historical romance fusing fact and fiction, set in pre-war Austria-Hungary.

John Berger * Here Is Where We Meet (March, Bloomsbury)

The reclusive cultural critic resurfaces with a characteristically experimental novel about memory and sensuality.

Dave Eggers * How We Are Hungry (March, Hamish Hamilton)

The editor of McSweeney's is, even for him, on prankish form in this collection of short stories, one of which consists entirely of black pages.

Kazuo Ishiguro * Never Let Me Go (March, Faber & Faber)

The bestselling author of The Remains of the Day returns with another tale of repression, denial and missed opportunity.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Tim Parks * Rapids (March, Secker & Warburg)

The year's most unlikely-sounding literary novel: an adventure story about canoeing. Parks, shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1997, uses the sport to examine human fragility.

Jonathan Safran Foer * Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (April, Hamish Hamilton) Having tackled the Holocaust in his first novel, Everything is Illuminated, the young American turns his attention to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. Expected to be one of the novels of the year.

Tim Lott * The Seymour Tapes (April, Viking)

As up-to-the-minute as ever, Lott tackles surveillance and tabloid voyeurism in a work already being billed as a "Sex, Lies and Videotape in fiction form for the 21st century".

Tim Winton * The Turning (April, Picador)

From one of Australia's most highly rated novelists comes this collection of overlapping stories about ordinary people.

Jilly Cooper * Wicked! (May, Bantam Press)

The first lady of the bonkbuster downs her riding crop and picks up a chalk duster. …

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