The Strategic Leadership Imperative for Executive Development

By Vicere, Albert A. | Human Resource Planning, February 1992 | Go to article overview

The Strategic Leadership Imperative for Executive Development


Vicere, Albert A., Human Resource Planning


Executive summary

In a time reorganization, revolution, and change, strategic leadership is essential to the competitiveness and development of an organization. The imperative for executive development, then, is to cultivate strategic leadership.

At the core of this challenge is a changing paradigm for both executive development and organizational competitiveness. The notion of strategic leadership as focal point for redefining executive development and organizational competitiveness can help create the dynamic tension essential to organizational learning - the ability to stay the course while "rocking the boat" to enhance organizational readiness and competitiveness in an unpredictable environment.

This paper discusses the concept of strategic leadership as a driver for executive development efforts. It presents a model for the strategic leadership process based on the stages of an organization's development, and then presents recommendations for using the model to help design more effective executive development strategies.

In a time of reorganization, revolution, and change, strategic leadership is essential to the competitiveness and development of an organization. Developing strategic leadership capability, therefore, should be the essence of executive development efforts. Strategic leadership is the hard-to-delineate ability of leaders to stay the course in an organization while continually "rocking the boat" so as to enhance readiness and competitiveness in an unpredictable environment. Executive development involves that set of processes used by the organization to build leadership talent. These processes include selection, assessment, and appraisal efforts; education and training programs; planned on-the-job assignments and career moves; and formal coaching/mentoring relationships.

This paper discusses how the concept of strategic leadership can be used to focus executive development processes and build organizational competitiveness.

A Model of the Strategic Leadership Process

One very useful and very meaningful way to examine strategic leadership is to discuss typical patterns of leadership throughout the evolution of an organization over time. A number of authors have made significant contributions to the understanding of this crucial aspect of executive and organization development (Greiner, 1972; Adizes, 1988; and Miller, 1989). The model portrayed in Exhibit 1 is a synthesis of the work of these authors, coupled with new insights on the role of strategic leadership in building organizational competitiveness.

The model is a simple Presentation of the stages of an organization's development over time, its inception through its potential demise. The dimension of time is charted on the vertical axis. In this instance, time is signified by five developmental stages from emergence - when an organization comes into existence, through the stages of growth, maturity, decline, and decay - when an organization ultimately ceases to exist. It is very important to note at point that this progression of stages is not inevitable - that effective strategic leadership can enable an organization to avoid the consequences of the final two stages.

The horizontal axis is a measure of orientation to change based on the concept of Adaption/Innovation Theory (Kirton, 1976). This theory holds that creative style and orientation to change can be gauged on a continuum ranging from a very strong focus on adaptive creativity or a preference to work with what exists in an effort to do better what is currently being done, to a very strong focus on innovative creativity or a preference to give little relevance or credibility to what currently exists, leading to a tendency to do things differently.

Ansoff (1988) noted that to survive and prosper in an industry, an organization must be able adjust its strategic behavior to the changing demands of the marketplace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Strategic Leadership Imperative for Executive Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.