Go: Rock: Could Elvis Bring a Grammy to Town ...?

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), February 11, 2005 | Go to article overview

Go: Rock: Could Elvis Bring a Grammy to Town ...?


Byline: By Alan Poole

WHEN Elvis Costello turns out at Warwick Arts Centre on Sunday night, he could be forgiven if his thoughts are 5,500 miles away.

While he is on stage in Coventry, the 47th Grammy Awards will be getting underway in Los Angeles - and Costello has been nominated in three categories, competing with the likes of Green Day, Velvet Revolver and The Killers in the best rock album category.

That honour is all the more remarkable because Costello, always renowned as an innovator, delved back nearly 20 years into his own back pages to find the inspiration for The Delivery Man.

Recorded in Oxford, Mississippi last year, it a concept album tracing the relationship between a murderer and three women who are all drawn to him in different ways.

And Costello, who plays Warwick Arts Centre on Sunday reveals: "The Delivery Man is actually a character imported from a song I wrote in about 1986 for Johnny Cash.

"I read this story in the paper about a man who confessed to murdering his childhood friend 30 years later, having been in prison for a number of other things.

"I thought this story was very interesting because he'd carried this burden of guilt of this childhood crime, so I wrote a fictional version of that story in a song called Hidden Shame, which John recorded.

"I've thought about that character a lot and my original intention was to make the album entirely The Delivery Man. …

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