The African Presence in Lower Manhattan, 1613-1863 (a Topical Reading List)

By Welch, Rebeccah | Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, July 2004 | Go to article overview

The African Presence in Lower Manhattan, 1613-1863 (a Topical Reading List)


Welch, Rebeccah, Afro-Americans in New York Life and History


Required Texts:

Harris, Leslie M. In the Shadow of Slavery: African Americans in New York City, 1626-1863. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

White, Shane. Somewhat More Independent: The End of Slavery in New York City, 1770-1810. Athens & London: The University of Georgia Press, 1991.

WEEK ONE

Introduction

Supplementary Readings

Ira Berlin, "Time, Space, and the Evolution of Afro-American Society on British Mainland North America," American Historical Review LXXXV (February 1980): 44-78.

Sharon Block and Kathleen M. Brown, "Clio in Search of Eros: Redefining Sexualities in Early America;" Kirsten Fischer and Jennifer Morgan, "Sex, Race, and the Colonial Project;" Michael L. Wilson, "Thoughts on the History of Sexuality," William and Mary Quarterly 60 (January 2003): 5-12; 193-198.

Kathleen Brown, "Engendering Racial Difference, 1640-1670," in Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996).

Barbara Jeanne Fields, "Slavery, Race and Ideology in the United States of America," New Left Review 181 (May/June 1990): 95-118.

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, "African American Women's History and the Metalanguage of Race," Signs 17 (1992): 251-274.

Shane White and Graham White, "Every Grain is Standing for Itself': African American Style in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries," Australian Cultural History 13 (1994): 111-128.

WEEK TWO

Atlantic World

Supplementary Readings

Ira Berlin, "From Creole to African: Atlantic Creoles and the Origins of African-American Society in Mainland North America," William and Mary Quarterly LIII (April 1996): 251-288.

John Thornton, "The Birth of the Atlantic World," "The Development of Commerce Between Europeans and Africans," "Slavery and African Social Structure," "The Process of Enslavement and the Slave Trade," (Chapters 1-4) in Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World 1400-1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998).

John Thornton, "Cannibals, Witches, and Slave Traders in the Atlantic World," William and Mary Quarterly 60 (April 2003): 273-294.

WEEK THREE

New York City

Leslie M. Harris, Chapter 1, "Slavery in Colonial New York," in In the Shadow of Slavery (Text)

Shane White, Chapter 1, "Slavery in New York City," in Somewhat More Independent (Text).

Supplementary Reading

Graham Russell Hodges, Chapter 1, "Free People and Slaves 1613-1664," in Root and Branch: African Americans in New York and East Jersey (1999).

WEEK FOUR

Slave Revolts

Supplementary Readings

Thelma Wills Foote, ""Some Hard Usage": The New York City Slave Revolt of 1712," New York Folklore XVIII (2000): 147-159.

Gerald W. Mullin, excerpts, Flight and Rebellion: Slave Resistance in 18th Century Virginia (NY: Oxford University Press, 1992).

Walter Rucker, "Conjure, Magic, and Power: The Influence of Afro-Atlantic Religious Practices on Slave Resistance and Rebellion," Journal of Black Studies 32 (September 2001): 84-103.

John Thornton, "African Dimensions of the Stono Rebellion," American Historical Review 96 (1991): 1101-13.

WEEK FIVE

Runaways

Shane White, Chapter 5, "Running Away," in Somewhat More Independent (Text).

Supplementary Reading

David Waldstreicher, "Reading the Runaways: Self-Fashioning, Print Culture, and Confidence in Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century Mid-Atlantic," William and Mary Quarterly LVI (April 1999): 243-272.

Jennifer Rae Greeson, "The "Mysteries and Miseries" of North Carolina: New York City, Urban Gothic Fiction, and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl," American Literature 73 (2001): 277-309.

WEEK SIX

Revolution and Emancipation

Leslie M. …

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