The Heights of School Science: Select Student Research Rises to the Top

By Harder, B. | Science News, January 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Heights of School Science: Select Student Research Rises to the Top


Harder, B., Science News


Original scientific research has earned each of 40 high school students a coveted slot in the final round of the 2005 Intel Science Talent Search. These teens emerged from a field of 1,600 competitors throughout the United States. Collectively, the finalists will receive more than $500,000 in scholarships.

Intel Corp. of Santa Clara, Calif., and Science Service, publisher of Science News, announced the 40 names on Jan. 26. Science Service has administered the annual competition for 64 continuous years, and Intel has sponsored it since 1998.

Fifteen of this year's finalists are female, and 19 fluently speak at least two languages. Five were born in China, one in Russia, and one in India.

"What's most encouraging is that these young people are just beginning their scientific journeys," says Intel chief executive Craig Barrett. "This group will be responsible for future discoveries that ... keep America at the center of innovation."

Past finalists have gone on to capture prestigious scientific awards. Last October, physicist Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology became the sixth former finalist to win a Nobel prize. About a third of the 2005 finalists hail from New York. One Maryland high school educated four finalists, and an Illinois school trained three others.

Each of the finalists will receive a notebook computer and a scholarship of $5,000 to $100,000 after a week of science activities and a final round of judging in March in Washington, D.C.

The finalists are

Arizona: James Andrew Cahill, Flagstaff H.S., Flagstaff.

California: June-Ho Kim, Monta Vista H.S., Cupertino; Aaron Sargent Goldin, San Dieguito High School Academy, Encinitas; Amber Irish Hess, Robert Louis Stevenson School, Pebble Beach; Kelley Harris, C.K. McClatchy H.S., Sacramento.

Florida: Sarah Rose Langberg, Canterbury School, Fort Myers; David Qianli Ying, Coral Reef Senior H. …

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