Immigration Solutions; Derivative U.S. Citizenship

Manila Bulletin, February 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

Immigration Solutions; Derivative U.S. Citizenship


Byline: Robert L. Reeves

As everyone is aware, U.S. citizenship grants innumerable benefits and privileges, including priority in petitioning certain family members for immigrant visas, the right to vote, and immunity from deportation/removal from the United States. Most people understand that U.S. citizenship can be claimed by persons born in the United States and through naturalization, a complex process discussed in a prior article in this column. However, there are other lesser-known but notable routes to establishing U.S. citizenship in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Birth Outside the United States Acquisition of U.S. Citizenship

Children born to U.S. citizens outside of the United States can claim U.S. citizenship if they meet certain requirements. Immigration laws regarding acquisition of U.S. citizenship have changed over the years, so whether an individual can claim U.S. citizenship through a U.S. citizen parent depends on when and where that individual was born, whether the U.S. citizen parent lived in the United States and for what time period, etc. For example, a child born today outside the United States to two U.S. citizen parents is considered a U.S. citizen, so long as at least one of the parents has resided in the United States, at any age, prior to the birth of the child.

However, claiming U.S. citizenship through a U.S. citizen parent can become complex where the child is illegitimate (born out of wedlock); the requirements differ vastly where the U.S. citizen parent is the mother or the father. Another complicated issue can arise where the U.S. citizen parent is deceased and cannot testify in support of the childs application for a U.S. citizenship certificate or passport; persuasive and valid documentary evidence will be very important in this aspect. Additionally, if a retention requirement was initially imposed on the child (a requirement has since been revoked), and a U.S. Embassy determined that the child "lost" U.S. citizenship for failure to fulfill the retention requirement, the child can reacquire U.S. citizenship by proving that he or she meets the requisite conditions and taking an oath of allegiance before the appropriate government official.Derivative U.S. Citizenship through U.S. Citizen ParentChildren who meet certain requirements can automatically derive U.S. citizenship under the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 (CCA), which went into effect on February 27, 2001. …

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