Preface

By Taylor, Amber Dale | Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, Fall 2004 | Go to article overview

Preface


Taylor, Amber Dale, Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy


The first issue of Volume 28 of the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy includes a variety of perspectives from the participants in the Federalist Society National Student Symposium. Hosted at the Vanderbilt University School of Law, this year's symposium discussed the development of private law in tort, corporate regulation, environmental protection, and international trade regulation, as well as the effect of civil litigation on freedom and personal autonomy. We are very pleased to have the opportunity to publish essays by the distinguished scholars who took part in the panel discussions and thank the Federalist Society for giving us this chance.

This issue also contains articles on a number of subjects currently debated in legal and political circles. The continuing struggle to cope with the power of the filibuster is illuminated by Martin B. Gold and Dimple Gupta's The Constitutional Option to Change Senate Rules and Procedures: A Majoritarian Means to Overcome the Filibuster. Mr. Gold and Ms. Gupta present a comprehensive historical analysis of the Senate's rulemaking process with respect to filibusters and offer possible solutions to the deadlock.

Mr. Alex Kreit sheds light on another pressing issue, this time relating to the progress of the federalism revolution and Congressional regulation of noncommercial activity. As the Supreme Court considers the state of such regulations in Ashcroft v. Raich, Mr. Kreit's discussion of the tangled state of Commerce Clause jurisprudence in the lower courts is educational and timely.

Recent criminal justice jurisprudence has repeatedly redefined the scope of constitutional punishments under the Eighth Amendment. Professor Laurence Claus offers a different perspective in The Antidiscrimination Eighth Amendment, arguing that the purpose of the Amendment is to prevent discrimination in punishment, not excessive punitive measures. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Preface
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.