Fair-Weather Fans Nonetheless Try to Cover Snow/rain/fog (Pick One)

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 14, 2005 | Go to article overview

Fair-Weather Fans Nonetheless Try to Cover Snow/rain/fog (Pick One)


Byline: Jim Davis

Here's why I'm grateful to seven Naperville Central students.

It's all about the weather.

As you read this, it could be raining or snowing. Might be foggy or crystal clear. I have seen all of those elements in the course of thinking about and writing this column, and who knows for sure what will happen between the time I send it along and when it gets into your hands.

I tell you this to set you up for a mini-whinefest on why there's little that makes reporters, photographers and editors recoil in terror more than the prospect of doing weather stories. But do 'em, we do.

Editors hate it because the weather changes before their eyes, and the stories we have written and photos we have taken could seem horribly outdated by the time you pick the paper off your wet/snowy/icy/foggy (pick one) driveway. We can't possibly compete with TV showing its live footage of the snowplows or the carefully coifed hair of a blond reporter whipping in the wind. Or the anchorpeople throwing snowballs at each other during the morning newscast. (I actually saw this last week. Oh, yes, I did.)

Most reporters look down their noses at weather stories because they don't seem like serious news. And, especially when compared to tsunamis and mudslides, many of these weather stories seem kinda lame - mostly centering on how annoying our commutes were.

Speaking of annoying, why was it that during my Wednesday- morning commute, a day on which I had to venture outside my car no less than five times (pick up paper in driveway, pick up dry cleaning, get some gas, get my morning coffee at the White Hen, walk from car into office), that the greater Naperville area was pelted by this rain that turned into a downpour every time I got out of the car ?

I digress. Reporters and photographers would just as soon not venture into a snowstorm/rainstorm/hailstorm/windstorm (pick one), but comfort aside, it's pretty tough to find a new angle. …

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