Members of Congress to Speak at Conference

By Pauline, Janice | Nation's Cities Weekly, February 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Members of Congress to Speak at Conference


Pauline, Janice, Nation's Cities Weekly


Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (D-Del.) and Norm Coleman (R-Minn.) as well as Rep. Mel Watt (D-N.C.) will address delegates at the upcoming Congressional City Conference.

The conference gets underway in Washington, D.C., on Friday, March 11 with Leadership Training Institute Seminars and concludes on Tuesday, March 15, with City Lobby Day on Capitol Hill.

Alexander will be the featured speaker during a general session on unfunded mandates on Monday morning, March 14. His remarks are scheduled close to the 10th anniversary of the landmark Unfunded Mandate Reform Act of 1995. Alexander will talk about strategies for strengthening that law and protecting cities and towns from expensive unfunded mandates.

Biden will address delegates Monday afternoon March 14 and will focus on public safety and homeland security priorities. Coleman and Watt will also be a part of this afternoon session, and their remarks will focus on Community Development Block Grants, housing and several other advocacy priorities key to America's cities and towns.

Alexander was the first Tennessean to be elected governor for consecutive four-year terms and the first to be popularly elected both governor and United States Senator. He chairs the Education and Early Childhood Development Subcommittee, the Energy Subcommittee and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Caucus. He has been U.S. Education Secretary, president of the University of Tennessee and the Goodman professor at Harvard's School of Government. He was chairman of President Reagan's Commission on Americans Outdoors and the National Governors Association.

Biden was first elected to the United States Senate in 1972 at the age of 29 and is recognized as one of the nation's most powerful and influential voices on foreign relations, terrorism, drug policy and crime prevention. …

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