The Three Linked to McCartney Murder

Daily Mail (London), March 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Three Linked to McCartney Murder


THREE senior IRA men have already been publicly named and linked to the murder of Robert McCartney.

One Irish media report said Mr McCartney's family and the police believe Jim 'Dim' McCormack wielded the knife that killed him - on the orders of top Provo Gerard 'Jock' Davison.

Gerard Montgomery, who has been an armed bodyguard to Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness in recent years, was also identified as allegedly being involved in the beating of Mr McCartney, before leaving the scene with two videos of CCTV footage.

Described as 'protected species' in Republican Belfast, McCormack and Montgomery, police believe, 'won their spurs' for their part in a bloody reprisal shooting of two Loyalist killers in the run-up to the 1994 ceasefire.

Two years earlier an armed Ulster Freedom Fighters gang walked into a betting office in the city's Lower Ormeau Road and killed five Catholics in a hail of bullets.

According to police sources, McCormack and Montgomery were called to a meeting of the IRA and an attack planned on those believed responsible.

Two UFF men, Joe Bratty, 32, and Raymond Elder, 33, had just left Bratty's parents' home when the doors of a white van were thrown open and a group of gunmen jumped out. …

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