Senate Passes Reform Measure; Bill Overhauls Bankruptcy Laws

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 11, 2005 | Go to article overview

Senate Passes Reform Measure; Bill Overhauls Bankruptcy Laws


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Senate yesterday passed one of the most dramatic overhauls of the nation's bankruptcy laws in history, signaling the end of an eight-year battle and a sea change in the political landscape.

If signed into law, which is almost assured since passing the Senate last night on a 74-25 vote, it will become this year's second major legal reform demanded by President Bush and promised by Republicans for years.

The bill will make it harder for people to walk away from debts, especially targeting deadbeat dads, compulsive gamblers and habitual frenzy shoppers.

"If people have the ability to repay some of their debt, should they not have to repay some of their debt?" asked Sen. Charles E. Grassley, the Iowa Republican who first introduced such a measure eight years ago to rein in frivolous bankruptcy filings.

"It seems to me to be fair to those people to whom they pay their debt. We preserve the principle of a fresh start, but we also establish a principle that if one has the ability to repay some of their debt, they are not going to get off scot-free," he said.

Last month, Republicans in both chambers pushed through an overhaul of the nation's class-action lawsuit rules. Still to come are bills on medical malpractice claims and the huge industry of asbestos lawsuits.

Opponents of the bankruptcy bill, who are all Democrats, portrayed the measure as a sop to corporate interests at the expense of the poor and sick.

Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, Massachusetts Democrat, said Americans have the lowest rate of savings in 40 years.

"And what does this administration want to do?" he asked. "They give Social Security to Wall Street. They took care of major companies with the class-action bill just a week ago, and now, they are ready to take care of the credit-card companies."

Of the Senate's 44 Democrats, 18 joined the chamber's lone independent in voting with Republicans for the bill. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, New York Democrat, was with her husband for heart surgery and was the only member not to vote.

The bill is expected to pass easily in the House, and Mr. Bush has said he will sign it.

"I applaud the strong bipartisan vote in the Senate to curb abuses of the bankruptcy system," Mr. …

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