Church Groups on New Panels to Vet Couples Who Want Designer Babies; FERTILITY AUTHORITY SET TO LOSE POWERS IN RADICAL OVERHAUL OF LEGISLATION

The Evening Standard (London, England), March 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

Church Groups on New Panels to Vet Couples Who Want Designer Babies; FERTILITY AUTHORITY SET TO LOSE POWERS IN RADICAL OVERHAUL OF LEGISLATION


Byline: ISABEL OAKESHOTT

COUPLES who want "designer babies" will have to win over a panel of politicians and church groups under radical new plans.

MPs say controversial decisions about fertility treatment should no longer be made by bureaucrats.

They want to end "closed-door" rulings on issues such as sex selection, cloning and IVF for older women. It is expected that a committee at Westminster will rule how far doctors can go.

The new panel is the centrepiece of plans to overhaul Britain's fertility laws. The move follows a long investigation by Westminster's science and technology committee.

Controversial decisions about fertility treatment cases are currently made in private by officials at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA). But in a major report this week, the science and technology committee will say the fertility watchdog should stick to paperwork and not sit in judgment on patients. Other key recommendations are expected to include: . An end to pressure on IVF patients to prove they will be "good parents".

. An end to regulations stifling vital research.

. A new "presumption of equality" for single women and lesbians seeking IVF treatment.

Under the present system, the fate of patients who want unusual fertility treatment rests in the hands of as few as three members of the HFEA. They are drawn from a 16-strong ethics board of medics and lay people appointed by the authority.

Unelected individuals - including a BBC finance director, a financial ombudsman and two journalists - are given sweeping powers to decide how far science should be allowed to go.

Patients, banned from attending hearings about their cases, are denied the chance to make personal appeals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Church Groups on New Panels to Vet Couples Who Want Designer Babies; FERTILITY AUTHORITY SET TO LOSE POWERS IN RADICAL OVERHAUL OF LEGISLATION
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.