In Orbit: XM and Sirius Take Satellite Radio to a Higher Level

By Toto, Christian | The World and I, October 2004 | Go to article overview

In Orbit: XM and Sirius Take Satellite Radio to a Higher Level


Toto, Christian, The World and I


Christian Toto is a writer for The Washington Times.

Once upon a time, disc jockey Vin Scelsa believed radio's accessibility served as the industry's bedrock--a transistor radio and fistful of batteries is all one needs. Now, the veteran gabber isn't so sure.

Scelsa is spinning discs for Sirius radio these days, one of two satellite radio companies offering consumers a new way to hear music and talk.

The disc jockey's conversion may smack of pragmatism--his long-running Idiot's Delight program long ago ran out of homes on the commercial radio dial.

As the number of satellite radio subscribers continues to climb, it seems likely that Sirius and industry leader XM Satellite Radio could become the HBO and Showtime equivalent for commercial airwaves. That transition could be quicker if the industry's "killer app," radio bad boy Howard Stern, ever makes good on his threat to bring his crude show to censor-free satellite radio.

XM recently signed former NPR mainstay Bob Edwards for a morning slot, while Sirius landed Eminem to help flesh out its hip-hop content, moves which should bolster programming cachet of each.

Tom Taylor, editor of the industry trade publication Inside Radio, says content will be the ultimate factor in whether satellite thrives. "People subscribe to HBO because they wanna see The Sopranos," Taylor says. "It's content. What made cable successful is that it delivered programming that wasn't available [elsewhere]."

Taylor isn't so sure the HBO/satellite comparisons will work for much longer. "All analogies break down," he says, when the Internet wild card gets played. "I'd argue that the technical innovation that's hanging over everything in the media is wireless broadband." He adds that he can surf the Internet while riding in a car in his New Jersey neighborhood, thanks to the fledgling Wi-Fi technology.

Music-based Internet sites could allow for the kind of audio alternatives that satellite currently boasts, he says, lessening the need to shell out a monthly subscription rate. "It's one of many new technologies that will become a part of our lives," he says.

For now, the satellite radio companies can point to some promising news of their own. After picking up more than a million subscribers in just over eight months, XM Radio now claims a total of 2.1 million-plus. The company projects 20 million subscribers by 2010.

Sirius comes in second in the two-company race with 500,000 subscribers. They expect that number to double by year's end.

Arlington, Virginia, resident Gary Haney, 33, signed on to XM Radio a year ago September after being frustrated by the musical options on Washington, D. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Orbit: XM and Sirius Take Satellite Radio to a Higher Level
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.